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History of Toronto and County of York in Ontario
Part IV: Toronto: Retail and General


Bakers, Confectioners, etc.

John Bain, proprietor of steam bakery, located at 339 Queen Street West. He is a native of Glasgow, Scotland, where he learned his trade and * worked for several years. Soon after his arrival here he established himself in the premises he now occupies, where he is doing a constantly increasing trade, using two waggons to distribute his goods around the city, and employing three men. His trade is mostly confined to supplying private families with bread and cakes, of which he manufactures a considerable variety.

G. H. Bowen, proprietor of the bread, cake and confectioner}' establishment, 84 Queen Street West, has been connected with the business since 1875. In 1879 he commenced business on his own account on Vonge Street where he only remained one year, removing afterwards to Sullivan Street. In 1883 he changed his address to his present location, where by energy and perseverance he has built up a respectable and 'increasing trade.

A. W. Carrick, baker and confectioner, corner of .Bay and Richmond Streets, is the son of A. W. Carrick. a' native of Ireland, who came to' Canada in 1847. The father had learned the trade of baker in Armagh, and on his arrival in this country, after working a period as journeyman, commenced business on his own account in this city, which he conducted until his death in 1862. After his demise the business was carried on by the family, the subject of our sketch taking entire possession in 1882. He runs two waggons, and employs live men, and is doing a prosperous wholesale and retail trade.

James Cox & Son, pastry cooks, confectioners, etc. Refreshment Rooms, 83 and 441 Yonge Street. The head of the firm is a native of Devizes, Wiltshire, England, and learned his trade, working at the same in his native town for fifteen years afterwards. He came to Canada in 1857, and a little later established himself in business in this city. He began only in a small way, but by perseverance, thrift and integrity the present magnificent business is the result; an illustration of what may be accomplished in a growing city like Toronto by the aid of these qualifications.

William Carlyle, baker, confectioner, and proprietor of the elegant and commodious refreshment parlours, situate at the corner of Queen and Simcoe Streets, was born at Stranraer, Wigtonshire, Scotland, where he learned his trade. In 1868 he came to Canada, and for two years worked at his trade as journeyman, afterwards establishing himself in business at 149 York Street. He remained there seven years, and in 1877 purchased and removed to his present premises, which have a frontage of 26 x 74 feet. He employs in all six hands, and manufactures goods both for wholesale and family trade, making a specialty of a superior class of confectionery for his own retail business.

George Coleman, proprietor of ladies' and gents' refreshment rooms, in King Street West, is a native of Suffolk, England, and came to Canada in 1846. He stayed in Montreal the first five years, and then settled [n this city where he has since lived. He learned m England the trade of baker, and worked at the same until 1851 when he commenced in this city on his own account. He was first for thirteen years at 69 King Street West, and nine years at 99 King Street West, and commenced business at his present location in 1874, where he has one of the finest business stands in this line :n the city.

George Constable, proprietor of steam bakery, 450 Queen Street West, was born in Blair Gowrie, Scotland, and came to Canada in 1853, having previously learned the trade of baker. He worked at his trade in this eity for some time, and in 1857 commenced business for himself. He manufactures for both wholesale and retail trade, employs six hands, and keeps three waggons for the delivery of his goods. Every variety of bread, cakes, confectionery and pastry are made in this establishment, and its proprietor was the first in this country to manufacture common bread by steam; having made four trips to the old country, he has all the modern appliances used in the manufacture of his lme of goods.

The Co-operative Union Baking and Milling Society. This is an outgrowth of the Bakers' Union, established in 1880, John MaeMillan, President, James F. Crait, Secretary ; have lately leased the buildings on Parliament Street and Wilton Avenue, where they expect to establish an extensive baking business. They are now employing five men and running three waggons to distribute their goods.

J. F. Craig, baker and confectioner, was born in Toronto, where he has always resided, and has been engaged in the confectionery business for the past twenty years. He first located on Church Street, afterwards removing to Berkeley Street, and finally locating at 262 King Street East, where he is engaged in the manufacture of confectionery exclusively fur the trade.

Robert Cureston, proprietor of bakery and confectionery at .24 Queen Street West, is a native of Glasgow, Scotland ; came to Canada with his parents when a child, who settled and lived in Quebec, where he learned his trade, and has worked at the same ever since. He started himself in business at his present location in 1882. Employs three hands in the bakery arid one to drive a waggon around town to supply his customers.

R. F. Dale, proprietor of bakery located at the corner of Por tland and Queen Streets. The quality of his goods is demonstrated by the fact that he received the first prize awarded for the best bread, at the Toronto Exhibition in 1882. He is a native of the "Braes of Bonnie I)oon," Scotland, and came to Canada in 1854. He learned his trade in this city, and in August, 1878, bought out a baking business at 93 Queen Street West, where he remained, somewhat over two years, afterwards removin 5 to his present quarters, where he manufactures goods for both the wholesale and retail trade, and employs five hands. His business requires two waggons for the delivery of his goods. The growth of this business can be summed up from the fact, that his weekly output of loaves in 1881 was two thousand, and for a corresponding week in 1884. was three thousand two hundred.

H. M. Devlin, proprietor of bakery, ice-cream and confectionery parlours, 483 Yonge Street. Does a large trade, both wholesale and retail. Employs five hands, and uses two waggons for the distribution of his goods in and around the city. He manufactures every variety of bread, cakes, confectionery and pastry, his chief sun being to supply only a first-class article. Mr. Devlin is a native of Simcoe County, but has lived in York the greater portion of his life. He carried on business in London, Ontario, for two years and a-half, and on his return to this city, commenced business on Church Steeet, where he remained one year, and in 1882 leased and took possession of his present premises.

C. J. Frogley, proprietor of bakery store, corner of Yonge and Yorkville Avenue, is a native of London, England, where he learned his trade, and continued at the same nine years. He came out in 1872, and in 1874 established himself in business at 497 Yonge Street, where he remained five years, he then moved to 768 Yonge, doing busines for another five years, when he bought and took possession of the large and commodious bakery and store at the above location, where he does a large wholesale and retail trade. Runs three waggons, employing five men, also keeps ice-cream and confectionery rooms.

David Galloway, baker and confectioner, 101 Church Street, is a native of Falkland, Scotland, where he learned his trade, and coming to Canada in 1871, he worked in this city as journeyman two years. In 1873 he removed to Acton West, and commenced business on his own account, from thence to Shelburne, where lie remained for five years. In 1883 he returned to Toronto and established himself at the above-mentioned address, employing three hands in the manufacture of several kinds of bread, confectionery and pastry, and using waggons for delivering to his customers.

Thomas Gardiner, proprietor of the Lorne Bakery, 6 Queen Street West, is a native of Scotland, and came to Canada n 1870. He acquired a knowledge of his trade in Dundee, Scotland, in which town he worked six years as journeyman. On his arrival in this city he worked as journeyman two years, afterwards establishing himself in business at 316 Yonge Street, where he remained three years. About this time he emigrated to Streets-ville, Ontario, and carried on baking business there until 1879, when he returned to this city and opened the premises he at present occupies. He makes a specialty in superior pastry and manufactures only for his retail trade. His confectionery parlour is tasteful and elegant, and is one of the attractions of its kind Toronto.

N. Gardiner, baker and confectioner, store, corner of King and Sherbourne Streets, was born in Scotland, and came to Canada in 1871. He learned his trade with his brother, J. Gardiner, and afterwards worked for him a considerable time. He established his present business in 1879, and now employs two hands, manufacturing a variety of goods fur his own retail trade. Although only recently commenced in business, Mr. Gardener is fast gaining a fair share of the trade.

R. Jose, proprietor of pastry and fancy cake bakery, 559 Queen Street West, was born in Quebec, April 5th, 1848, and carne to Toronto with his parents two years later, where he has since resided. He served his apprenticeship with Mr. J. Cox, who now carries on business on Yonge Street, and worked with him one year after his time was out. In 1869 started business on his own account, on Queen Street, four doors east of Peter Street, and remained there about three years; he then removed to Yonge Street and did business there for over two years, and in 1871 removed to his present place of business, when that locality was nothing more than open fields. Mr. Jose employs three men, and manufactures I variety of fancy goods in his line of business for his own retail trade.

Edward Lawson, importer of teas and groceries, and manufacturer of confectionery, wholesale and retail, 93 King Street East, first established his business on Yonge Street in 1843, In i860 he moved to his present location where he employs fifteen hands. Mr. Lawson was born in Cumberland, England, in 1819, and settled in Toronto in 1830.

J. D. Nasmith, proprietor of the steam bakery, corner of Adelaide and Jarvis Streets, is the son of John Nasmith, a native of Glasgow, Scotland who formerly conducted a bakery for many years in Greenock, Scotland and by industry and economy was enabled to retire from business. Speculation combined with the great fundamental changes effected through that repeal of the Corn Laws, absorbed his capital, and in 1844 he came to Canada to attempt the restoration of his broken fortunes. He remaine-1 short time in Montreal, removing afterwards to this city and rented what was then known as the old Herald building, corner of Newgate and Nelson Streets, now Adelaide anil Jarvis, where the present proprietor, J. D. Nasmith was born. He commenced with a very limited capital, and once more as fie thought had laid the foundation of future prosperity. His hopes on i£is occasion were doomed to disappointment. In 1849 he was burned out lost nearly everything he possessed. Through the encouragement and substantial assistance of the Hon. John McMurrich, he was induced to build again and from that time forward fortune favoured his efforts, and in 1870 he retired in favour of his son, to enjoy that ease which his years of labour and mental trials certainly entitled him. His death occurred four years later. J. U. Nasmith, his third son and successor to the business, owns now one of the largest baking establishments in the city, and being on a recent tour through Great Britain was astonished to find among all the large bakeries he visited, that few could compare with his own in Toronto in variety of mechanical appliances for use ill his line of business. He employs fifteen hands and three delivery waggons. He recently opened a branch store and lunch counter at 31 King Street West.

Franklin Reynolds, baker and confectioner, 164 Queen Street West, is a native of this city, being a son of William Reynolds, one of the first bakers in Toronto. Out subject acquired a knowledge of the business from his father—whose store was situate at the corner of Gould and Yonge Streets—and continued with him until i860. On the retirement of his father in that year Franklin succeeded to the business, which he continued to conduct at the "old place" six years longer. He then moved to Victoria Street, remaining there but one year, however, before he bought and took possession of his present premises. Mr. Reynolds does a large wholesale trade, employing three men and sending out two waggons. He manufactures all kinds of bread and cakes, and the large yearly increase of his sales is the result of careful attention to all the details of his business.

Rich\rd Reeves, baker, 52 Centre Street, was born in Dublin, Ireland, 1817, where he learned the trade of baker, afterwards working at the same in the City of Wexford. He came to Canada in 1837, and soon after his arrival joined the militia in Kingston, under Colonel Benson. He came to Toronto in 1839, and established himself on York Street in the business to which he had been brought up, and which he carried on for thirteen years. In 1864 he located at his present address, where he has since continued to conduct his trade. He employs three men and manufactures every variety of bread.

Robertson Brothers, manufacturers of and wholesale dealers in confectionery, 83, 85 and 87 Queen Street East, established their business in 1862. They employ one hundred hands and use five thousand barrels of sugar annually. They have five travellers.

George Robertson, proprietor of confectionery and refreshment parlours, 253 Yonge Street, is a native of Scotland, and came to Canada when a boy. He has resided in this city since 1851, and learned his trade with Dodson, Shields & Morton, with whom he continued to remain as manager some years after the completion of his apprenticeship. He has carried on his present line of business for twenty-one years at various places in the city, and in 1880 he took possession of and opened his present elegant store and parlours.

Charles Schmidt, proprietor of the bakery, go Queen Street West, does a large wholesale and retail trade, employing six men, and owns two delivery waggons. He is a native of Germany, and learned his trade in London, England. He worked as a journeyman twenty-four years, during that period travelling through France, Belgium, Switzerland, Germany, England, and the United States. He came to Toronto in 1876, and for four years worked at his trade in this city, commencing business for Inmself at his present address in 1880, where he manufactures all kinds of bread, cakes, confectionery and pastry. He makes a specialty of the "Toronto Brown Bread,'' for which he has a patent.

Joseph Tait, 660 Yonge Street, baker, confectioner and grocer. Established business in 1872. Employs thirteen hands and runs five waggons. Deals in all kinds of flour and feed, canned goods, and everything in the grocery line.

Henry Tomlin, proprietor of bakery at 320 Queen Street West, and retail store at 514 Queen Street West. He is a native of Hampshire, England, and came to Canada in 1870, having previously learned his trade at Peckham, England, and worked at the same for several years. Mr. Tomlin has been connected with the baking business since his arrival here, and the extent of it is now such as to require two waggons to distribute his goods. Employs four hands in the manufacture of bread and cakes. He also carries on a milk business in connection with the same.

Harry Webb, caterer and confectioner 447 Yonge Street, established his present business in 1876. He was born in Toronto, and is the second son of Thomas Webb, a native of Hampshire, England, who came to Toronto in 1841. It was after several years' absence from his native city Mr. Webb returned in 1876 and commenced his present successful business. He married m 1871 Miss Mary Hartrnan, second daughter of the late Mr. William Hartman, Vaughan.

James Wilson, baker and confectioner, 497-9 Yonge Street, is a native of Inverness, Scotland, being the second son of James Wilson, a schoolmaster in that district. Our subject carne to Toronto in 1868, but it was not till 1881 that he established his present business. His specialty is Vienna bread and rolls.

Booksellers and Stationers.

J. S. Robertson & Bros., booksellers, stationers and newsdealers, corner of Toronto and Adelaide Streets. Also subscription book publishers, and proprietors of the Chronicle, Whitby, Ont. The business was established at Whitby in 1874. Messrs. Robertson purchased the Post-office Book Store of this city, the firm being represented by Mr. Charles Robertson. The store has a frontage on Toronto and Adelaide Streets of sixty feet. This firm employs over one hundred agents in their subscription book business, which is controlled from Whitby. The Messrs. Robertson are Torontonians by birth.

Winnifrith Bros, booksellers and stationers, 6 and 8 Toronto Street. The business was established in 1856 by Mr. C. A. Backas, in a part of the premises at present owned by the firm. In 1883 the present proprietor added to the building, and now has one of the finest store frontages in the city. They keep a large and varied stock of English and American works, and import direct. Mr. Winnifrith is a native of the County of Kent, England, and came to Canada in 1871. He located in Hamilton four years before he settled in Toronto.

Bookbinder.

Carswell & Co., 28 Adelaide Street East, bookbinders and publishers of law books. Established m 1870 by R. Carswell, who m 1878 took in three partners ; the firm being now composed of R. Carswell, W. E. Collins, and Arthur Poole. They employ about twenty hands.

Boots and Shoes.

H. & C. Blachford, 87 and 89 King Street East, manufacturers and retail dealers in all grades of boots and shoes, make a specialty of the finer classes, and are importers of French, English and American goods. The house was first established in 1864, at 131 King Street East, under the name of A. Blachford, and at the end of two years, the room becoming too small for the increased business, they moved to 107 King Street East; eleven years after, their largely-increasing trade necessitated their removal to their present commodious premises. Their trade is not confined to this city, but extends from Nova Scotia to British Columbia.

They carry, in ladies' and children's tine goods, the largest stock in the Dominion, employing at the present time over twenty hands.

E. Dack & Son, 73 King Street West, is the oldest and best shoe house in Canada, having been established over half a century ago, by the late Matthew Dack, and during that time has gradually increased its business year by year, and now counts as its customers almost all the prominent men of the Dominion, and sends goods from one end of the country to the other, and throughout the United States. They manufacture and devote their whole attention exclusively to gents' fine hand-made custom shoes, and thereby have attained perfection in that line, and have gained an enviable reputation as makers of the best wearing and fitting goods on the Continent.

Alexander Gemmell, dealer n boots and shoes, 115 King Street West, was born in Ayrshire, Scotland. In 1851 he came to Toronto, and in 1854 commenced his present business in a shop on King Street, near Yonge Street, having had thirteen years' experience in Scotland. He afterwards moved to his present location, where he is doing a tine trade. In 1849, in Scotland, Mr. Geminell won the first prize for the best essay by one of the working classes, on "The Temporal Advantages of the Sabbath."

John Green, manufacturer of fine shoes and general dealer in all classes of boots and shoes, No. 103 Yonge Street. He commenced business in 1883 at his present place, which remains about one of the oldest stands for boots and shoes .n this city, having been occupied previously by Mr. John Smith, for some time Reeve of Bracebridge, and before him by William Guinane, who carried on business there for several years. Mr. Green is a native of Brampton, and has resided n Toronto for the last ten years ; his father, John Green, sen'r, was a native of Norfolk, England, and for man)- years a resident of the County of Peel 1 this Province.

S. R. Hanna, boot and shoe dealer, 428 Yonge Street. The business was established by his brother in 1878, and came into Mr. S. R. Hanna's hands in 1882. He was formerly with the firm of J. D. King & Co., and is a native of the north of Ireland, emigrating to this country in 1872.

Patrick Higgins, wholesale and retail boot and shoe merchant, 144 Yonge Street, is a native of Roscommon, Ireland, being the only son of Charles Higgins, who came to Toronto n 1838, and died in 1874. Mr. Higgins commenced business m 1859, near Richmond Street West, and in 1864 removed to the premises he yet occupies.

Thomas Langton, boot and shoe maker and dealer, 307 Yonge Street, is a native of Sligo, Ireland, and came to Montreal in 1849. He removed to Toronto in 1854, and commenced business in the above line on King Street, north-east corner of George, removing to his present stand in 1873. He is a P. M., A. F. & A. M., King Solomon Lodge, No. 22 G. R. C.

Wm. Mosceey, boot and shoe dealer, corner of Yonge Street and Bismarck Avenue. He established his business in 1873, and since that time has done a constantly increasing trade. He was born at Stafford, England, and came to Canada in 1866. He was connected with the firm of Sessions, Turner & Cooper, as cutter in their manufacturing establishment.

John B. Thompson, boot and shoe dealer, 142 King Street East, is a native of this city, born in 1830; his father, the late Thomas Thompson, being a native of Yorkshire, England, came out and settled in this city, the year of our subjects' birth. Soon after his arrival he engaged in school teaching, and afterwards, through the encouragement of friends, established the first store for the sale of ready-made boots and shoes in this city on King Street near Yonge. He afterwards sold out, and erected the Mammoth House, where our subject, the father, and brother engaged for some years in the dry goods and clothing business. In the year 1870 our subject separated himself from the business, and taking the boot and shoe part of the trade, established himself at the above address, where he is making extensive sales. The death of his father occurred in 1868.

The Butchers and the Markets.

The present St. Lawrence Hall building was erected in 1849 in place of a brick structure which had to be pulled down in consequence of the damage it received by the great lire of that year. The edifice is said to be a copy of the Temple of Jupiter Stator, at Rome, the facade consisting of a portico of fluted columns supporting a pediment, upon which the arms of Toronto are sculptured, the whole surmounted by an open cupola. The market proper is approached from King Street by an arcade, and lined by butchers' stores, while the outer portion is set aside for the sale of farmers' and garden produce. Among the principal butchers who do business in this market are the following:—

Britton Brothers, butchers, 13 and 15 St. Lawrence Market. This firm was established in 1854 by James Britton, father of the present members of the firm, and who now resides at 221 George Street. The Britton Brothers came into possession of the business in 1881. They buy their stock in the country and do their own killing.

Thomas J. Campton, butcher, in stall No. 5, St. Lawrence Market-The business was established first on York Street in 1873, and was moved to its present location in 1882. Mr. Campton runs one waggon. lie was born m Maroon Town, Jamaica, June 3rd, 1841, being the son of Thomas Campton, a Serjeant in the 68th Light Infantry, and came to Toronto in company with his father m 1842.

George B. Cann, 28 St. Lawrence Market, was established on Yonge Street in' 1870, and moved to his present location in 1883. He kills his own meat and keeps poultry in season. He runs two waggons.

Henry R. Frankland, son of G. F. Frankland, was born in York Township in 1858. He does a wholesale and retail business in St. Lawrence Market, 22 and 24. He is serving his second term as Deputy-Reeve for York Township.

John Gallagher's meat market is at 17 and iy St. Lawrence Market. The stand was formerly occupied by the late Samuel Toy, who commenced at a very early date. Mr. Gallagher worked with Mr. Toy from i860 to 1880, and on his death assumed the control of the business. He does mostly his own killing, and runs two waggons.

John Mallon & Co., 12, 14 and 16 St. Lawrence Market; who are also exporters of cattle. They do a large business in mess beef and beef hams with the Lower Provinces; also a wholesale and retail business. They find a great drawback to the shipment of meat to the Lower Provinces in the strong competition with American dealers, who ship m bond, store on vessels, and thus evade the duty of $2.00 per barrel.

St. Patrick's Market, on Queen Street West, is much smaller than St. Lawrence, and has no pretensions to architectural beauty.

Crealock & Brown, 7, 9 and 10 St. Patrick's Market, established in 1874. They keep pickled and fresh meats and run two waggons.

St. Andrew's Hall and Market building, also on Queen Street West, but further west than the preceding, is a handsome white brick structure in the French Renaissance. It is occupied, among others, by the following butchers:

J. H. C. Brown, butcher, 2 St. Andrew's Market, does a wholesale and retail business; he buys his stock in the country and does his own killing. He employs four hands, runs two waggons, and deals in all kinds of fresh meats, also hams, tongues, poultry, and vegetables in season. He first established business at 33b Queen Street West in 1874, moving to the market in 1876.

Jolfw Chantler, butcher, first established on Queen Street, in 1867, and upon the opening of St. Andrew's Market he removed to his present location, 11 St. Andrew's Market. He runs one wagon. He was born in Manchester, England, in 1813, and settled in Toronto in 1866.

William Oxemiam, butcher, 12 St. Andrew's Market, first established his business at St. Patrick's Market in 1855, and in 1861 removed to the corner of Chestnut and Queen Streets, and in 1876 established himself at his present location, He runs one waggon. He was born in Devonshire, England, in 1815, and settled in Toronto in 1848.

The following butchers do business in their own stores in various parts of the city:

William H. Arksey, meat market at 112 Queen Street West, established his business in 1876, and runs one waggon. The business was formerly conducted by the late James Brown. Previous to embarking in the meat business Mr. Arksey was engaged 'n the grocery and liquor trade at 172 Queen Street West.

W. J. Ayles, butcher, 91 Agnes Street, has been employed in the business since 1878. He moved to his present place in 1883.

G. P. Bezley, meat market at 387 Yonge Street, established the business at Yorkville in a wholesale way in i860, and at his present location on Yonge Street in 1870. He kills all his own stock, going to the country for it. He does a retail as well as a wholesale business, and runs two waggons.

T. H. Bills' meat market, 66 Queen Street West, was established in 1863. He does most of own killing, and keeps all kinds of poultry and vegetables. He runs two waggons.

J. H. P. Bonnick, meat market, 393 Yonge Street, was established on Yonge Street as early as 1S57. He has ever since been in the trade, and is one of the oldest butchers in the city. He was born in the County of Kent, England, in 1813, and settled 'n Toronto in 1857.

G. H. Boulton, 237 Yonge Street, established business by himself in 1874, but the stand had been occupied previously by others m the same line. He does part of his own killing, and buys part at the market. J le runs two waggons.

John Brown, meat market, 222 King Street East, established business on King Street in 1877, and moved to his present location in 1881. He keeps a general line of meats, poultry, vegetables, etc., and runs one waggon.

T. Chantlfe, son of John Chantler, has a meat market at 581 Oueen Street West, which was established in 1876. He runs one waggon.

John Dancy, meat market, 233 Church Street, first established his business at the corner of Chestnut and Edward Streets in 1868. He moved in 1870 to 231 Yonge Street, thence to 453 Yonge Street, and to his present location in 1882. He kills his own cattle, deals in poultry and vegetables, wholesale and retail, and runs three waggons.

J. B. Dwison, butcher and provision dealer, 451 Yonge Street, established business in 1870 on Parliament Street, moved to 384 Yonge Street in 1872, and to his present location in 1875. deals im game, poultry, and vegetables in season, and runs two waggons.

C. H. Dunning, 359 Yonge Street, commenced business in Toronto in 1857 on Queen Street West, and is one of the oldest butchers in the city at present in business. In 1865 he removed to the St. Lawrence Market, and , in 1870 opened a shop on Yonge Street in connection with his stall in St. Lawrence Market. In 1877 he located in his present commodious premises. Mr. Dunning has made a specialty of meat curing, in which branch of his business he has long held first place in the city ; his corned and spiced rounds of beef, sugar-cured hams and bacon especially are purchased by private families over a great part of Ontario.

Joseph Emery, meat market, 597 Queen Street West, established business on Centre Street in 1857, and moved to Queen Street in 1859. He is one of the oldest butchers in the city. He runs two waggons.

T. Foster, 260 Queen Street East. Established in 1872. Wholesale and retail fresh meats and provision merchant. A large supply of smoked hams, bacon, pickled pork, lard, sausages and vegetables of all kinds, poultry, and other things too numerous to mention. One waggon and one cart.

Henry Haynks, 101 Grosvenor Avenue, corner of Oxford Street, butcher, established in 1882, keeps all kinds of fresh and salt meats, vegetables, fruit and poultry in season.

A. J. Mannell's meat market, toi Queen Street West, was first established at an earlv date by H. Jones, who sold to George Griffin in 1880. Mr. Mannell obtained possession in 1883. He runs one waggon.

William Henry Miller, meat market, 206 Queen Street East, established in 1879, keeps a general assortment of fresh and salt meats, poultry, vegetables in season, etc. He runs one waggon.

James Mumford, proprietor of the Baldwin Street Market, known as No. 1 Baldwin Street, first established on Yonge Street in 1857, and moved to his present location in 1880. He runs two waggons, and keeps a constant supply of fresh and salt meats, poultry and vegetables in season. He kills small stock, cures his own hams and bacon, and manufactures sausages.

Henry Norris' central meat market, 333 Yonge Street, was established by James Ward in 1861, and came into Mr. Norris' hands in 1872. Mr. Norris purchases stock amongst others from Thompson, Flanagan, Blong and R. Pugsley, and runs two waggons.

John R. Outiiet, family butcher, 45 Grange Avenue, established in 1881, keeps salt meats, hams, bacon, and sausages; also poultry and vegetables in season. He runs one waggon.

F. H. Peakce, meat market, 233 Yonge Street, established in his present location in 1856, being the oldest active butcher on Yonge Street. He also does a general trade in fresh and corned meat and general provisions. He runs two waggons.

James E. Pitts, meat market, 327 Yonge Street, established in 1875 at 381 Yonge Street, and moved to his present location in 1876. He runs two waggons.

F. L. Prior, 324 Spadina Avenue, meat market and family butcher. The business was established by J. & J. Woollings and managed by Mr. Prior, who became owner of the establishment in 1882. He runs one waggon, and keeps poultry and vegetables in season.

William Robinson, butcher, 207 Gerrard Street East, established in 1876, kills his own cattle, and runs two waggons. He deals in poultry and vegetables.

Samuel T. Rosenberg, 116 Burnley Street, butcher, established on Claremont Street a 1882, and in his present place in 1883. He keeps all kinds of fresh and salt meats and vegetables, and runs one waggon.

William Schubait, 174 Brunswick Avenue, family butcher, established in 1878, keeps fresh and salt meats, poultry, vegetables in season, and he runs one delivery waggon.

I). C. Shaeff.r, meat market, 112 Church Street, established business in 1874. keeps poultry and vegetables, and runs one wagon.

M. J. Stack, corner of Eippincott and Nassau Streets, butcher, keeps all kinds of fresh and salt meats. Established in 1880. He kills his small stuff.

F. B. Stephens, 53 Oxford Street, family butcher, established in 1883, keeps all kinds of fresh and salt meats, vegetables and poultry in season.

R. Stone, meat market, 379 Parliament Street, established on Yonge Street in 1871, and moved to his present location m 1883. He runs two waggons, and keeps poultry and vegetables in season.

John Symons, meat market, 231 Yonge Street, occupies an old stand established as early as 1859, having come into possession m 1877. He purchases at the market, ami runs two waggons.

Thomas Taylor, 204. St. Patrick Street, butcher. Established in 1884. Keeps poultry; bacon, etc.

Thomas Watts, meat market, 331 King Street East, keeps a general stock of provisions, game, poultry, flowers and vegetables in season. He runs one waggon.

J. & J. Woollings, McCaul Street Market, at 163 and 165 McCaul Street, established in 1873. khl all their own stock. Joseph Woollings, the elder brother, lives on a farm at Islington, butchers and comes to town three times a week ; he does a wholesale and retail trade. The firm deals in poultry and vegetables in season, also hams, bacon, and pickled meats. They employ ten hands, and run three waggons.

William Wordley, butcher and pork-packer, corner of Church and Carlton Streets, was established first at 325 Church Street in 1871, and removed to his present location in 1872. He does all his own killing, runs six waggons, and employs eleven men. He first started in a small way and now does fully $75,000 annually, packs about $10,000 of pork annuallv, corns beef extensively, and does a large business in game and poultry in season, etc.

Carpets.

John Kvy, importer of carpets and house furnishings, 34. King Street West, first commenced his business .n 1847, and located n his present premises m 1880. The building is 205 x 26 feet, and is four storeys high. Fifty hands are employed in a business that amounts to a quarter of a million annually. Mr. Kay's carpet sewing factory is on Queen Street West.

Coal and Wood.

Robert Allingham, coal and wood merchant, 179 and 181 Bathurst Street, was born in Ballyshannon, County Donegal, Ireland, and came to Toronto in 1874 with his parents, both of whom are still living here. He commenced his present business in 1883, and keeps two teams.

Bill Bros., coal and wood merchants, 166 Simcoe Street. This business was established twenty years ago by Thomas and James Bell, who were born in the County Fermanagh, Ireland, and came to this country in 1858. It is now carried on by James Bell. The sales average $60,000 yearly.

William Bell, coal and wood merchant, and real estate agent, 83 Dundas Street, is a native of Woolwich, England, and came to Canada with his parents during the Rebellion in 1837. He served his time to a machinist in Montreal, and for a number of years afterwards travelled :'n the Cmted States. He finally settled in Toronto, and in 1879 was elected School Trustee for St. Stephen's Ward, a position he held for four years. He was elected Alderman for the same ward in 1881, by a large majority, and continued to represent the constituency until 1883; when he resigned, having been appointed Tax Collector. On the annexation of Brockton to the city (now St. Mark's Ward), he was elected School Trustee, and is still on the Board. His business which has been established now two years is very extensive, especially in the coal and wood department, and his real estate business is greatly on the increase. He is a man highly respected in his vicinity, and the public offices he has and is at present filling is sufficient testimony that he is fully deserving of public confidence.

Patrick Burns, coal and wood dealer, Bathurst and Front Streets, established his business :n the year 1856. He handles about thirty-five thousand cords of wood, and one hundred and fifty thousand tons of coal annually, and employs about three hundred men, and from one hundred and fifty to two hundred horses and carts for delivery. Ilis wood comes to the city by all r always, and his coal both by lake and ran. Tie has several offices in different parts of the city for the receiving of orders, which are connected with the yard by telephone. As an instance of, Mr. Burns' great success in this line of business, t is only necessary to Say that at the commencement two horses were requisite for delivering purposes. Mr. Burns is a native of County Fermanagh, Ireland, and came to Toronto the same year In which his trade was established.

John Chisholm, coal and wood merchant, hay, straw, and seed store 447 King Street East, was born at Kingston, Ontario, and established business here about 1876. Works two horses and carts, and handles about 1,000 tons of coal and an equal number of cords of wood annually.

Dennis Daniels, coal and wood merchant, 628 Yonge Street, was born in England, and came to Canada with his parents in 1836. In 1854 he commenced his present business in Yorkville on a small scale. He now handles about five thousand tons of coal, and five thousand cords of wood yearly.

William Hale Howard, coal ami wood merchant, 25 Victoria Street, is the eldest son of William Howard, of Devonshire, England. He married Susannah Wotton, of the same place, and in 1872 came to Toronto, where in 1879 he opened his present business. His sales of coal average eight thousand tons, and those of wood five thousand cords annually. He keeps three teams of horses.

Samuel Hunter, coal and wood, 245! Spadina Avenue, and 321 Queen Street West, was born in the County of " Green Bushes,,r Tyrone,- Ireland, May 3rd, 1831. On emigrating to Canada in 1852 he came direct to Toronto. He has now been ill business here twenty one years. When the vessel "Maggie Hunter" (Captain Frank Nixon) was lost Mr. Hunter was left behind to the extent of §13,000, there being no insurance. In spite of this drawback however Mr. Hunter has accumulated by strict business attention considerable property, and may be justly spoken of as a man of independent means.

Neavin McConnell, coal and wood merchant, 78 Queen Street East, was born in the County of Peel, Ont. After farming for some years in his native county he came to Toronto in 1875, established his present business which has proved very successful. He sells about two thousand tons of coal, and fifteen hundred cords of wood annually.

William McGill & Co., coal and wood merchants, 146 Bathurst Street. Mr. McGill was born in Berwickshire, Scotland, and came, to Canada with his parents in 1837. His father settled at Springfield, Dundas Street, where he had a grist and saw mill, and where William remained till he was twenty years of age. We may incidently add that soon after their arrival in Toronto the father was called out by the Government to aid in suppressing the Mackenzie revolt. On leaving home, William removed to Oakville and carried on a grocery business for some years, afterward conducting a similar business in Guelph for five years. In 1872 he came to Toronto and established himself in the coal and wood trade, which has proved very successful. They imported direct from the mines by rail last year twelve thousand tons of anthracite coal, and received one thousand, three hundred and eighty-five car loads of wood of all kinds by Northern Railroad. Mr. McGill married in 1863 Eliza Jane Bullock, by whom he had a family of seven children, six of whom are still living. His wife died February 28th, 1884, and in her he lost, at once, a cheerful helpmate and a wise and faithful councillor.

Elias Rogers & Co. The firm whose card appears on the next page opened an office in Toronto in 1876. Mr. Rogers had previously been interested in coal mines ;n Pennsylvania which he continued to operate. His partner Mr. F. C. Dinniny, a wealthy gentleman residing in Fhnira, N.Y., is president of two large coal mining companies. The firm have always been in a position to procure their coal at first cost, and have supplied their customers with the best grades at the lowest prices. This together with their strictly honourable course,' and careful attention to business, has rapidly won for them a first place ri the coal business of this province. They supply the wholesale trade direct from the mines, and their facilities for doing a retail business in Toronto are unsurpassed. Their sheds for storing coal on Esplanade Street are the largest in Canada. They also do a large wood business, and keep two steam sawing and splitting machines constantly running. Mr. Rogers was born in North York, near Newmarket he is a comparatively young man, and i| .s gratifying to note his success. His father who bore the same name was one of the early settlers, and a man of sterling qualities.

William Spence, coal and wood merchant, 486 King Street West, is a native of County Donegal, Ireland, being the youngest son of William Spence, farmer. Mr. Spence came to Toronto in 1864, and after farming for ten years, commenced his present business. He has three horses and carts, and handles about, one thousand cords of wood and one thousand tons of coal annually.

Stinson & Sons, coal and wood merchants, and proprietors of express and furniture vans, 96 Terauley Street. This business was established in 1873. teams exclusive of those hired, and ten men are employed, while six thousand tons of coal, and four thousand cords of wood are handled annually. The firm is composed of James Stinson, who was born in Ireland, and came to Canada in 1842, and his sons Alexander A., and Edward Stinson.

James H. Titus, coal and wood merchant, 12 Queen Street, Park-dale, was born in Nova Scotia in 1846, and came to Toronto with his parents in 1849. For some time he was engaged as captain on lake vessels, and in 1872 commenced his present business. He keeps four teams and handles about' three thousand tons of coal, and one thousand cords of wood annually.

Thomas R. Whiteside, coal, wood, flour and feed merchant, 102 Sherbourne Street, was born in Toronto in 1844. In 18G7 he established a store in the Township of Brock, and in 1875 commenced Lis present business, which averages $25,000 per annum. For some time he was School Trustee for St. Thomas' Ward.

l

Crockery, Glassware and Pottery.

R A. Borrowman, Staffordshire House, 289 Yonge Street, importer and dealer in china, glassware, fruit-jars, plated and fancy goods, cutler. lamp-fixtures, etc. This business was established by John Oulcott in 1869, and w as taken possession of by Richard Moyer, subsequently by its present proprietor iij 1881. He imports most of his goods from Staffordshire, England, France and Germany, and keeps constantly on hand one of the largest stocks in the city; all for cash.

James R. Burns, proprietor of the Toronto Stoneware Pottery, located on Scadding Street, is a native of County Tyrone, Ireland, and came to Canada in 1879. He had learned his trade in the land of his nativity where in conjunction with his brother he had carried on a pottery for fifteen years. For some little time after his arrival on this continent he worked as journeyman, eventually purchasing his present business, where he has six hands employed in the manufacture of all kinds of stoneware, turning out about $10,000 worth of goods annually.

Hutchinson & Peterson, 100 Front Street East, manufacturers of bottles, stoppers, and soda water supplies, patented by Hutchinson. Established business in 1881, and supply the trade. They employ four men.

John Sinclair, dealer in earthenware, glass and fancy goods, 245 Yonge Street, is a native of Scotland; came to America in 1850. He spent three years in New York, and two years in Montreal previous to settling in this city. He first commenced business at No. 315 Yonge Street, where he stayed five years, afterwards removing to his present address, where he does a large business n articles as above described.

Druggists.

Arthur W. Abbott, chemist and druggist, Rossin House, 131 King Street West, is a native of Toronto, being the second son of Isaac and Jane Hutchinson Abbott, of English extraction. Mr. Abbott is a graduate of the Ontario College of Pharmacy (1883), and established his business in 1882, succeeding Elliott & Co.

R. G. Bredin, druggist, 326 Spadina Avenue, was born in Cobourg, 1850, being the second son of Rev. John Bredin, D.D. His early education was received in the Common School, finishing with two years at the Victoria University. He took a special course in chemistry and obtained a diploma in 1871 from the Ontario College of Pharmacy. Mr. Bredin began business in Belleville, continuing the same m Buffalo and New York, and locating and commencing business in this city in 1882 at the present address, where he does a flourishing business in drugs and chemicals, his specialty being the filling of our leading physicians' prescriptions. Mr. Bredin married in 1875, Miss Augusta Moore of this city, daughter of Mr. Rodney Moore, a U. E. Loyalist; her mother is a descendant of Sir Walter Raleigh.

F. T. Burgess, druggist and manufacturing chemist, 36 f. King Street East and Kingston Road, is a native of Markharn, and established his business in 1883. In addition to general dispensing, the following specialties should be mentioned: Burgess' Magnetic Oil, Burgess' Blackberry Cordial, Burgess' Jersey Lily Tooth Powder, Burgess' Worm Powders, Burgess' Liver Pills, all being in universal demand by the trade. He employs ten hands. Mr. Burgess is of Irish descent.

R. M. Dickson, druggist, corner Church and Queen Streets, was born in Ottawa in 1860. In 1881 he passed the final examination at the Ontario College of Pharmacy, and commenced the drug business at the corner of Queen and Sumach Streets, the firm then being under the name of R. M. Dickson & Co. In the same year he moved to his present quarters, having bought out the old-established business of C. A. Mitchell, which he is now carrying on successfully.

A. B. Eadie, chemist and druggist, 237 King Street East, is a native of Brantford, Ontario, and an undergraduate of Toronto University. In 1832 he acquired the business formerly conducted by Mr. D. S. Thompson. He is of Scotch descent, his grandfather, Andrew Eadie, .having emigrated from Paisley, Scotland, about the year 1813. His father, Robert Eadie, formerly carried on business as a general merchant at Mount Pleasant, but is now living retired.

S. Nelson Eree, druggist, Queen Street East, was born in the Count}' of Waterloo in i860. In 1882 he passed the final examination at the Ontario College of Pharmacy, and started business in his present location.

Albert Harwood, 316 Queen Street West, dealer in drugs, chemicals, and general toilet additions, dispenser of physicians' prescriptions, etc. This business was organized by its present proprietor In 1867, and at that time he was but the second druggist in the west end of the city. Since his establishment he has considerably improved his position, and is at present doing a large and prosperous trade.

George Hodgetts, druggist, 305 Yonge Street, of English parentage, was born in Ireland, 1826, being the eldest son of Lieutenant-Colonel Hodgetts, who carne to Canada in 1829 with the 24th Regiment. His parents retured to England in the spring of 1837, where, the subject of this sketch, after having received his education at a private academy, was apprenticed to the drug business for seven years. Subsequently he purchased the business where he served his apprenticeship, which he carried on till 1857, when he returned to Canada, and after fulfilling a bookkeeper's engagement, resumed the drug business, which he has since continued to conduct, and is at present doing a large and lucrative trade. Mr. Hodgetts was one of the organizers of the Canadian Pharmaceutical Society, which has since been incorporated as the Ontario College of Pharmacy. He was also W. M. of St. Andrew's Lodge, A. F. & A. M.; also Grand Steward cf the Grand Lodge of Canada, and Grand Scribe N. of the Grand Chapter. Since 1873 he has been Registrar and Treasurer of the Ontario College of Pharmacy, and was also one of the Council of the College for three years. ' Mr. Ilodgetts married, in 1850, Miss Gitoes, of Westbromwich, England, by whom he has four children, all sons, as follows: George, Thomas, Charles, and Albert.

Edward Hooper, 43 and 45 King Street West, was horn in London, England, in 1808. He served his apprentices! ip as druggist in his native city, and emigrated to Canada in 1832, living at Kingston and other places for several years. He finally settled in Toronto in 1838, entering into the employ of Mr. Beckett, then the leading druggist of Toronto. Mr. Hoopet continued this connection until the year 1850, when he bought the business himself, since which time he has been the senior partner. The business has grown to immense proportions, but notwithstanding the heavy duties devolving upon him in connection with this large business he has devoted a great deal of his tune to other important business and financial institutions. Was elected President of the Canada Permanent Company last year, a company he has served in different capacities for the past twenty-five years. Has also been connected with the Confederation Life Assurance Company since its commencement. He is at present Chapman of the Insurance Committee. Although now in his 76th year, his energies do not seem in the least impaired, but he is hearty and strong, with indications of many years yet of usefulness.

Henry A. Knowifs, druggist, was born at Guelph, August 29, 1839, his father being Thomas Knowles. In i860 he came to Toronto, where he has since resided. He has been in his present place of business since 1869. He married Mary Matilda Playter, daughter of James Playter, by whom he has had six children.

J. R. Lee, chemist and druggist, corner of Queen and Seaton Streets, also at 339 King Street East. Mr. Lee first commenced business at 339 King Street East in 1868, and in 1872 opened a branch store on Queen Street, and is now doing one of the largest dispensing businesses in the city. The business is retail, giving employment to six clerks.

Neil C. Love, chemist and druggist, 1G6 Yonge Street, is a native of Saltcoats, parish of Anderson, Ayrshire, Scotland, being the youngest son of Robert Love, manufacturers' agent of that town. Mr. Love was partially educated in Scotland, afterwards completing his studies at Omagh, County, Tyrone, Ireland. He came to Toronto in 1842, and finished his business education with Lesslie Brothers, King Street. In 1845 he became assistant to his brother Robert., a druggist on Yonge Street, with whom he remained five years, subsequently commencing business for himself on the same street, but three months had barely expired ere he was burnt out. He removed to a store opposite, remaining there till 1870, when, having purchased 155 Yonge Street, he took possession and conducted business "here till 1881, since which year he has been located at his present premises. Mr Love has been for many years a J.P. for both city and county. He has taken an active and important part is municipal affairs for many years, and still represents St. Jarnes' Ward as Alderman. He has for many years been Manager of the House of Industry, and has been Chairman of the same Institution since 1881. Mr Love is a man highly respected both in his public and private capacity. As a magistrate he is conscientious in the discharge of a grave duty, and as a private citizen he is ever ready to bestow advice and counsel on those who need it.

Angus Matheson, chemist and druggist, 136 King Street West, was born in Inverness, Scotland, in 1813. He early enlisted in the 93rd Regiment, and was for several years Depot Hospital Sergeant. He came with the regiment to Toronto in 1838, and received his discharge at home in 1852. He then took up the drug business, which he has since continued, having been educated for the medical profession.

John P. May, druggist, 212 Queen Street East, was born in I oronto in 1852. He is the son of Dr. S. P. May, well known in medical and educational circles. He first began the drug business in 1867, serving with Henry J. Rose. He is now manager for J. R. Lee.

O. H. Phillips, chemist and druggist, 38 Queen Street West, is a native of Schomberg, Ontario, his father being the first white child born there. Mr. O. H. Phillips was educated at the Ontario College u>f Pharmacy.

H. Sherris, druggist, 444 Queen Street West, was born in London, England, 1849. H® was educated in Cornwall, England, and came to Toronto in 1873. For three years he was the manager of the drug store which he now occupies. At the expiration of that time he bought it, and since then has conducted a very successful trade.

D. L. Thompson, chemist and homoeopathic pharmacist, 394 Yonge Street, was born in Cavanville, Durham County, Ontario. He first established his business in Huron County, Ontario, in 1859, and ten years later commenced in thi^ city. He deals in general drugs and dispensing; also a specialty in homoeopathic medicines. His father was by trade a tanner, and was born (n the Town of Lancaster, England, and came to Cavanville, Canada, in 1819.

Henry Algernon Turner, chemist and druggist, 568 Yonge Street, was born in Toronto, and is the son of Henry Turner, a native of Bath, England, who came to this country in 1849, and died in 1857. Mr. Turner is a graduate of the Ontario College of Pharmacy, and established his business in 1877. He is Secretary to the Toronto Royal Arcanum Council, No. 263.

W, C. Wild & Co., 462 Queen Street. This business has been established a great number of years, the present firm buying it during the present year. They are doing a large and thriving business in drugs, medicines, chemicals, etc., making a specialty of filling physicians' prescriptions. Mr. Wild, the senior partner, is the son of the Rev. Dr. Wild, our popular preacher, of the Bond Street Congregational Church. The College of Pharmacy of Ontario granted Mr. Wild his diploma in 1884 with honours.

Joseph Wright, chemist and druggist, 100 Queen Street West. This business was established first by Mr. Samuel Howarth, who continued up to 1862, when he was unfortunately burnt out, the building being entirely destroyed. The present building, now occupied by Mr. Wright, was moved to the vacant lot by Dr. Howson, who opened a drug store, which he conducted until 1871. Mr. J. Wright then joined him in the business, the firm being known as J. Wright & Co., until the death of Dr. Howson in 187;. since which time it has been wholly in the hands of Mr. Wright. He is a native of Lincolnshire, England, and came to Toronto in 1853. Since becoming a resident of the city he has taken great interest in municipal affairs.

Dry-Goods.

Armson & Stone, select dry goods merchants, 49 Kmg Street West. The business was established m 1881 under the title of Armson & Floyd, the latter retiring in 1883, being succeeded by Mr. Stone. The firm deals largely in foreign silks, dress goods, fine dry-goods, mantles, etc., and employs a staff of twenty-five salesmen and ladies, and hands engaged in manufacture. Both members of the firm are of English birth.

J. S. Boddy, dry-goods, 256 Queen Street East, established his business in 1878, which was first located a few doors west of his present situation. The store has a frontage of 22 x 50 feet deep, and is two storeys high. He employs three clerks, and does a fair business a millinery and fancy goods. Mr. Boddy is a Canadian by birth, and has been a resident of Toronto since 1872.

Chas. S. Botsford, retail dry-goods merchant, 48b Queen Street West. Business established in March, 1878. It was first located at the corner of Queen and Portland Streets, and removed to its present quarters in 1883. The store has a frontage of 35 x 85 feet, and is three storeys ::n height. This is doubtless the finest store of its class on the street, the establishment giving employment to a staff of seventeen clerks. The materials supplied are dress goods, staples, prints, fancy goods, gents' furnishings, carpets, oil cloths, tweeds and woollens, silks, window shades, lace curtains, window cornices, cornice poles, and general house-fittings.

Broom & Son, dry-goods, 283 Yonge Street. This business was established m i860 at 246 Yonge Street, and was removed to its present locality in 1882. The store has a frontage of 25 x 100 feet, and is four storeys high. Finn is composed of Mr. James Broom and his son, Mr. Walter Broom; the former being born in England, and having settled n Canada in 1853.

J. Brown, 95 King Street East, dealer in dry and fancy goods, is successor to Mrs. M. Pollard, who established this business in 1854, having occupied at stated periods stores on Bay, King and Yonge Streets. Mr. Brown, her nephew, took possession in 1879, now located at the

above address. The store has a frontage of 30 x 140 feet, and is known as "Kensington House." He employs a staff of fifteen hands, and is doing an extensive trade. Mr. Brown is a native of London, England, and came to Canada with his parents in 1858.

John Catto & Co., dry-goods merchants, King Street. This business was established in 1864 at the present address, which has a fine frontage, facing the Post-office. They make a specialty of silks and household napery, and are direct importers, employing a staff of sixteen hands. Mr. Catto is a native of Scotland, and came to Canada in 1854, since which time he has been a resident of this city.

J. Collins & Co., 3 Crocker's Block, Queen Street West. Business established in 1875. They deal largely in dry-goods, gents' furnishings, clothing, carpets, oilcloths, etc. The dry-goods interest of Toronto is one of such vtal importance to the sum total of our commercial wealth, and a factor of such powerful influence in the development and welfare of every other branch of trade, as to demand special recognition by any work bearing upon the resources of this city. Prominent among the most important houses engaged in this branch of trade, is that of J. Collins 8c Co. The building occupied is 20 x 80 feet, and four storeys high, provided with all the modern facilities for exhibiting and handling goods. The immense stock constantly kept on hand is systematically located in proper apartments, each under experienced and competent persons, and the whole is managed with judgment and order. Personally Mr. Collins has been long known in Toronto as a man of business and reliability. He is a son of the late Captain Collins, of Her Majesty's navy. Mr. Collins was born in Liverpool, England, and came to Canada with his parents when seven years of age. He has since been a resident of Toronto, and we cheerfully accord him a place in these pages.

A. W. Cooper. Business established in 1883 at his present location, 216 Yonge Street, where he has a frontage of twenty-five feet by ninety. Carries staples and fancy dry-goods, dress and mourning goods. Trade principally confined to the city. Employs a staff of five ladies and salesmen. Mr. Cooper was born in Canada, and has been a resident of the city for the past year.

E. H. Dent, dry-goods merchant, 330 Yonge Street, established his business in 1881. The store has a frontage of 32 x 120 feet, and is three storeys high. Conducts a staple and fancy dry-goods, gents' furnishings, etc., trade. Mr. Dent is of English birth, ami came to Canada in 1842, and has been a resident of this city since 1860.

G. W. Dunn & Co., "Golden Crown" dry-goods house, 240 and 242 Yonge Street. Business established in 1864. The building has a frontage of 32 x no feet, and is four stories high. The firm employs a staff of four teen salesmen and ladies, and about forty hands in dress-making department. They carry ladies' furnishings, millinery and mantles, and do one of the largest fancy goods business in the city.

T. Eaton & Co., general dry-goods merchants, 190 196 Yonge Street. This well-known firm established their business in 1857, at kirkton, Huron County, under the title of T. Eaton, where they remained until 1869, when they opened in St. Marys, and remained there till 1869. Removing to Toronto, they located for a short t:rne on Front Street, afterwards taking up the premises at 178 Yonge Street. In 1883 they opened the extensive store they now occupy, where are offered fashionable dry-goods, millinery, mantles, ladies' and children's fine shoes, carpets, house-furnishings, etc. The store has a frontage of 52 x 125 feet, and is three storeys high. The employes number ninety-two salesmen and ladies. The business has improved wonderfully since its commencement, and now ranks as one of the largest in the city. The building is fitted with all modern appliances, including elevators, steam-heating apparatus, etc. Mr. Eaton is a native of Ireland and came to Canada in 1856.

Farley & Co., "The Bon Marche" dry-goods and millinery establishment, Nos. 7 and 9 King Street East. In 1855 Mr. Arthur Farley began business in a store on Queen Street West, opposite Peter Street, removing from thence to the corner of the two streets, where he remained until 1880 and then retired. The present firm comprises W. W. Farley and James C. Farley, the eldest and the youngest sons respectively of the original promoter of the business. Their premises front 30 x 100 feet; the class of goods dealt in include every description of dry and fancy goods, millinery, mantles, etc., their extensive sales necessitating the employment of a large staff of clerks, etc. Mr. W. W. Farley, the eldest son of Mr. A. Farley, was born in Toronto, and during his career has taken an active part m municipal affairs, having at one time represented St. Andrew's Ward as alderman. He has also identified himself closely with the Temperance Societies of the city, and other societies organized for benevolent and charitable purposes. Mr. J. C. Farley was also born in Toronto in 1863, and is a younger brother of the above. In his care is placed the management of the office of the firm. Like his elder brother, he is an ardent advocate of temperance reform, and holds the position of Hon. President of the West End Christian Temperance Association.

Mrs. Halliday, dry-goods, 508 Queen Street West. Business was established in 1861, and is at present the oldest dry-goods business on Queen Street. The store has a frontage of 28 x 60 feet, in which is done a general dry-goods trade. Mrs. Halliday has been a resident of Toronto since i860, and has two sons associated with her in the business, Mr. Alex, and Mr. John Halliday.

J. M. Hamilton, dry-goods merchant, 184 Yonge Street, established his business in 1878 at 246 Yonge Street, and removed to his present situation in February, 1883. His stock includes silks, satins, brocades, velvets, gloves, hosiery and underclothing. The store has a frontage of 26 x 80 feet. A staff of clerks is employed, also hands engaged in the manufacturing department. A large letter order trade is done in connection with this business. Mr. Hamilton is a Scotchman by birth and came to Canada in 186S, and has been a resident of the c-ty for the last six years, previous to which he had conducted a successful business in Hamilton.

Husband & Co., dry-goods merchants, 352 Yonge Street. The business was established in 1875, under the title of Summers & Husband, the latter retiring from the firm in the year 1880, and commencing at the above address. The building has a frontage .of 25 x 84 feet and is five storey s high, including basement. Carries a general stock of dry-goods, carpets, house-furnishings, and does both city and country trade, which gives employment to a staff of eleven clerks, etc. Mr. Husband is a native oi England and came to Canada in 1879, having been a resident of Toronto since that time.

Lailey & Co., dry-goods, etc., 582 Queen Street West. Business established in 1872. The firm carries on a general trade in dry-goods, clothing, shirts, overalls, etc. Their store has a frontage of 18 x 75 feet in depth. Mr. Lailey was born in London, England, and came to Canada in 1832, since which time he has been a resident of the city.

Lukes, Dagge & Co., dry-goods merchants, corner of Yonge and Adelaide Streets. The business was established in 1882, the firm having taken up the stock of ]. W. Gale & Co. They deal in dress goods, silks, velvets, laces, staple and fancy goods, and make a specialty of gents furnishings and ordered shirts. The store has a frontage of 25 x 200 feet, and is four stories high. Mr. Lukes is of English birth and came to Canada in 1869. Mr. Dagge is a native of Ireland and came to Canada m 1866.

Tuos. Mcliroy, retail dry-goods, 385 King Street East. Established m 1878. The store has a frontage of 18 feet by 34 feet, two storeys high. He carries a stock of dry-goods and fancy goods, tweeds, carpets, etc. Mr. Mcllroy was born in Ireland and came to Canada in 1862, since which time he. has been resident in Toronto.

Robert McKay, dry-goods merchant, 250 and 252 Queen Street East Business established in 1874. The frontage of the premises occupies that} one feet, and the staff engaged numbers eight hands. Carries dry, staple and fancy goods, gents' furnishings, carpets, etc. Mr. McKay is a Canadian by birth, and has been a resident of this city for twenty years.

McKendry & Fakrar, dry-goods merchants, 278 Yonge Street. Business established in 1883. Deals in staple and fancy dress goods, milliner v, ladies' and children's underclothing. The store has a frontage of 26 x 100 feet, with a height of five stories. They employ a staff" of twenty-five hands in connection with the business, which is principally confined to the city. Mr. McKendrv is a native of Ireland and came to Canada in 1878, and previous to his commencement in business was nativer for T. Eaton & Co. The store of this firm is fitted with plate glass windows thirty-five feet in width.

Edward McKeown, 182 Yonge Street. Business established in 1875. Deals largely irj dry-goods, and has recently added dress and mantle-making to his business. The store has a frontage of 30 x 150 feet, with four fiats. Employs a staff of sixty hands, including clerks, and does a large letter order trade. Mr. McKeown is a native of Ireland and came to Canada in 18G6, having ^ince that time been a resident of this city.

James Mitchell, dry-goods, 218 College Street, is a native of Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and came to Canada in 1854. He was sixteen years in Bryce, McMurrich & Co.'s, and in 1872 opened a dry-goods store on Queen Street West, and n 1878 moved to the present stand.

W. A. Murray & Co., dry-goods merchants, 21 King Street East. This business was established by Wylie & Murray, at the above address, which at that time occupied but a frontage of twenty-five feet; Mr. Wylie occupying the top flat as a residence. In 1858 Mr. Wylie retired from the firm, and from that date until 1872 Mr. Murray conducted the business alone. Mr. Drynan then entered the firm, which is at present composed of Messrs. W. A. and W. T. Murray and himself. The store now has a frontage of 82 x 200 feet, and is five storeys in height. A large business is conducted m dry-goods, milinery, house-furnishings, carpets, etc. . he staff employed includes over 300 clerks and hands engaged in the manufacture of clothing. From small proportions the volume of trade accumulated by this firm now reaches $500,000 yearly. Mr. Wr. A. Murray is of Scotch birth, and came to Canada at an early day, and during the last thirty years has made 119 trips across the Atlantic. Mr. Drynan is also Scotch by birth and came to Canada in 1857. With regard to the goods dealt in by this firm, we may add, special attention is given to silks, mantles and velvets; the trade being chiefly confined to the city and adjoining towns. Lire letter order department finds continuous employment for three hands. This establishment is conducted on the regular departmental system, each having to recognize its own profit or loss. The parcel delivery department is very methodical and well arranged, reflecting great credit on the management. There are six deliveries daily.

George Noule, dry-goods, 701 Yonge Street, was first established at 214 Yonge Street in 1867, where he remained till 1874, afterwards locating at No. 349 for seven years, taking possession of his present premises m 1881. The store has a frontage of 25 x 40 feet, and carries a general stock of dry-goods. Mr. Noble is of Caledonian birth and came to Toronto in 1862.

Page & Page, retail dry-goods, 202 and 204 Yonge Street. This business was established in 1857 by Mr. 1 has. Page, who retired in 1882 from the firm, which is at present composed of C. J. and J. H. Page. Their store has a frontage of 26 x 107 feet, with a height of five storeys. They make a specialty of fancy dry-goods, including ladies' and children's wear. The firm employs a staff of forty clerks and other hands. Messrs. Page are of English birth and came to Canada at an early day.

Henry Parry, fancy goods merchant, Kingston Road. Business established in 1877, and includes dry and fancy goods, stationery, etc. The premises have a frontage of 60 x 90 feet, and are two storeys in height. Mr. Parry is a native of Manchester, England, and came to Canada as early as 1842, and has been a resident of Toronto since that year, being until of recent years in the contracting and building business.

Petley & Petley, dry-goods merchants and clothiers, 128 King Street East. This business was established in 1854 in Hughes Bros., and affords a striking example of the progressiveness of this branch of trade in Toronto. In 1872 the business came into the possession of Petley & Co., whose energy, combined with commercial knowledge, laid the groundwork of that success which at present marks the career of the firm. In 1883 they found it necessary, in consequence of the rapidity with which the business had grown, to greatly enlarge their premises, and in so doing pulled down the obi store and rebuilt on an extensive scale : the present store having a frontage of 55 x 130 feet, with a height of five storeys. The staff employed consists of salesmen and ladies, and one hundred and fifty hands in the tailorng, millinery and carpet thirty manufacturing departments. In. addition to a good city trade, they gain a fair share of country custom also, and have built up a wide-spread reputation for cheapness and durability in their class of goods. The members of the firm are Canadians by birth, Mr. Win. Petley having been a resident of this city for seventeen years.

Phoenix Hall. Opened in 1883 at Queen Street West. Manager : Mr. II. Hutchinson. This store has a frontage of twenty-five feet by ninety deep. Does a general dry and fancy goods trade, including mantles, etc. Mr. Hutchinson was born in Yorkshire, England, and came to Canada in 1881.

Robert H. Platt, dry-goods, 288 King Street East, established hunself m business in 1866, at Phelpston, Simcoe Count)', where he conducted a general store and performed the duties of postmaster till 1881. The following year he opened his present store, and continues to carry on a good trade in staple and fancy goods. He is agent for Bazaar patterns. Mr. Platt was born m Toronto in 1835, and the eldest son of Thomas Platt, deceased.

A. E. Rocque, general dry-goods merchant, 242 Queen Street East. Business established in 1869 by I5. McGraw, who conducted it in connection with a boot and shoe trade until 1876, when Mr. Rocque took charge of the business.

J. Rowland, retail dry-goods, 173, N. E. corner of Yonge and Queen Streets. Business established 1854. Carnes general dry-goods, carpets, oil cloth, house-furnishings, etc. The store has a frontage of 25 x 90 feet, and is five storeys high, including basement. He employs a staff of six salesmen, the trade extending both through city and country. We may mention that Mr. Rowland counts among bis customers the third generation of families who trade with him. He was born in the Island of Jersey and came to Canada with his parents in 1840. He has been a resident of the city since 1842.

J. H. Shearer, dry-goods merchant, 226 Yonge Street, established his business in 1872. The store has a frontage of 40 x 85 feet. Does a general dry-goods and furnishing trade, which is confined principally to the city. Employs a staff of eight salesmen and ladies. Mr. Shearer came from Scotland n 1866 and has since been a resident of Toronto.

R. Simpson, dry-goods, 174, 176 and 178 Yonge Street, established his business in 1873, continues to conduct a large and successful trade in dry-goods, millinery, mantles, carpets, and all kinds of house-furnishings His store has a frontage of 75 x 100 feet, and is three storeys high, the busi ness g:\ing employment to fifty-seven clerks, etc.

Thomas Thompson & Son, "Mammoth House" dry-goods establish ment, 136-140 King Street East. This business was commenced as early as 1834, and is now in its third generation. The commodious premises have a frontage of 57 x 120 feet, and four storeys high, also a capacious warehouse used for reserve stock. They employ a staff of two hundred hands in the store and manufacturing department. The first flat is devoted to fancy goods, hosiery and gloves, staple and dress goods, ready-made and ordered clothing, gents' furnishings, etc. The second flat to millinery and mantles, carpets and house-furnishings. The third to manufacturing clothing, millinery, shirts, etc. The returns are now §250,000 yearly. The firm is composed of Thomas Thompson, Boyce Thompson and W. A. Thompson, who are all Canadians by birth ; and amongst the firm, we may add, one hundred and fourteen journeys have been made to England for purchasing purposes. The trade is about equally divided between city and country. There are thirty-seven thousand, six hundred and twenty square feet of flooring to the premises, which are heated by steam.

George Vennell, dry-goods and stationery, 115 Kingston Road. Business established in 1880. The store has a frontage of 18 x 50 feet, and is two storeys nigh. Mr. Vermeil was born in England in 1840 and came to Canada in 1870. He has been local correspondent for one of our city daily papers for the past five years, and has the largest newspaper trade in the east end of the city.

R. Walker & Sons, dry-goods merchants, "Golden Lion" Buildings, 33-37 King Street East and 18 Colborne Street. This is one of the oldest business houses in the city, and, as such, deserves more than a passing notice. In the year 1835 Win. Lawson occupied the premises at No. 9 King Street East, where he carried on a clothing business, which was purchased during that year by R. Walker, who took possession of and conducted the business until 1848. He then removed to the east half of the present premises, which were bm'lt by Mr. Patterson and himself, this being the first cut-stone building 111 the city, the firm at the same time being joined by Mr. T. Hutchinson, who, however, retired in 1855, when the eldest son of Mr. Walker entered the company, which was hereafter known as R. Walker & Son. In 1862 two other sons entered the firm, and about this time was purchased the west half of the lot on which the present building stands. In 1866 was erected the " Golden Lion " Buildings, which have a frontage of 52 x 200 feet and a height of seventy-six feet. T he whole building is lighted by a magnificent centre dome, one hundred and thirty-five feet in circumference, rising fifty-five feet from the floor, containing two thousand square feet of glass. This pile of buildings was erected at a cost of $45,000. In 1875 Mr. R. Walker retired from the firm, and the business has since been carried on by Mr. Robert Irving Walker and Mr. Frederick W. Walker, Mr. H. Walker, a nephew, becoming a partner in 1884. The goods dealt in by the firm include clothing, dry-goods, mantles, milliner) , carpets, house-furnishings, etc.

T. Ht Waters, dry-goods and millinery business. Established in 1882 at No. 138 Kingston Road, where he has a frontage of sixteen feet by twenty-eight feet. Carries a stock of general dry-goods and millinery. Mr Waters is an American by birth and has been resident in Toronto since 1877.

Charles Welsman, dry-goods merchant, was established in 1881, at No. 132 Kingston Road, where he does a general dry-goods trade. His store has a frontage of 26 x 34 feet deep. He also owns the boot and shoe store adjoining. Mr. Welsinan was born in Devonshire, England, and came to Canada in 1865, and has been a resident of Toronto for the past fourteen years. He was a car inspector on the Grand Trunk at the Union Station for eight years.

T. Woodhouse, dry-goods merchant, 123, 125 and 127 King Street East. Established in 1871. The store has a frontage of 55 x 150 feet, and is four storeys high. The trade carried on is in dry-goods, clothing, millinery, mantles, carpets, oil cloths, etc. lie employs a staff of twenty-six salesmen, and has one hundred hands. engaged in the manufacture of millinery, clothing, etc. Originally the store of Mr. Woodhouse was only 13 x 30 feet, the business being conducted by himself and a boy. He is a native of Ireland and came to Canada in 1866, and has since been a resident of Toronto.

Dyers.

"A. M. Denovan, 329 Yonge Street, proprietor of the Perth steam dye-works. They were first established in 1877 by J. Eyres & Son, and came into the hands of the present owner n 1883. Employs four hands.

George N. Lucas, 388^ Yonge Street, proprietor of steam dye-works. Does all kinds of dyeing, cleans and dyes kid gloves, feathers, etc. Established his business in 1870, and employs six hands. Mr. Lucas is a tailor by trade, and makes, turns, alters and repairs all gentlemen's clothing. All clothing dyed warranted not to stain. First-class tailors employed to finish gentlemen's clothing.

Robert Parker, 824 Yonge Street, proprietor steam dye-works. Established in 1876. Does all kinds of colouring, cleans and dyes gloves, feathers, piece-goods and wholesale dry-goods. Employs tLirty-four hands, thirteen male and twenty-one female. Has three offices in Toronto and one in Hamilton. It is probably the largest establishment of us class in Canada.

Thomas Squire, proprietor of the Ontario steam dye-works, located at Parkdale; offices: 306 Yonge Street, City. The present works were erected in 1883 (size of building, 30 x 70 feet), and give employment to four hands. Silks, damasks, kid gloves, feathers and other articles are dyed at this establishment. Mr. Squire commenced his business in 1869, has been a practical dyer for forty years.

Engravers.

Alexander, Clare & Cable, engravers and lithographers, Mail Building. This firm was organized in 1880. They do all kinds of wood and steel engraving and general lithography, making a specialty of fine commercial, card and invitation work, and employ from twenty to thirty hands. They are all practical men and Torontonians, but spent considerable time with the best American Phographic establishments in order to perfect themselves in their particular branches.

George E. Patterson, manufacturer of bookbinders' stamps and general engraving, 31 Adelaide Street East, was born near Kingston in i8b2, and settled in Toronto in 1871.

Express Companies.

A. E. Fisher, proprietor of improved furniture and moving vans and cartage agent, 62 Gerrard Street East, is a native of Kent County, England, and came to Canada in 1870. He settled in this city two years later, and in 1874 started his present business with one single waggon, and now owns four single and double waggons.

Thomas Fisher, proprietor of Fisher's Express, 539 Yonge Street, is a native of Hampshire, England, and came to Canada in 1870. He soon after established his present business, the extent of which can be summed up m the fact that he keeps six waggons on the street-movmg furniture and express goods. He is also agent for the Thomas piano, manufactured at Hamilton, and the "Thomas" organ, manufactured at Woodstock, and also for Stewart's furniture.

John D. Irwin, agent in this city for the Canadian and American Express Companies, is a native of Colborne, Ontario, and has been identified with the Express Company for thirty years, fifteen of which were spent at Hamilton, and the remainder in this city.

J. J. Vickers, "Vickers' Express." This enterprising citizen's first connection with this business was in 1852, when, on his arrival n this cit\ he entered the service of the American Express Company, with whom he remained two years. On the completion of the Northern Railroad he embarked in the business on his own account, and from a small beginning has, by perseverance and honourable exertion, built up the present extensive concern, which employs a great number of people. He has had control of the Express Department of the Northern Railroad since 1854, also that of the T. G. & B. since its opening, and in connection with the service nine messengers arrive and leave Toronto each day. His eldest son, J. A. D. Vickers, is acting superintendent. (For further particulars of Mr. Vickers life, see Miscellaneous Biographies.)

Florists.

W. Hill, 461 Yonge Street, florist, established m 1880, keeps a general assortment of cut flowers and choice table plants, floral designs, has a hothouse on the premises, and buys largely from outside parties. He also deals in all sorts of foreign and domestic fruit, fish, game, poultry and confectionery.

Thomas Vaughan, Seaton Village, florist and market gardener, settled in Toronto in 1856, and has always been engaged in the same business. Has one green-house and one forcing-house. Wholesale and retail trade. Employs from two to five men, and runs two delivery waggons.

Flour and Feed.

John Lumbers, dealer in flour, grain and produce. In 1869 Mr. Lumbers established his business at 17 Francis Street with a very small capital, but, with perseverance and close attention to business, through increasing trade he was obliged to remove from Francis Street and took possession of 101 Adelaide Street East. While there, and in the year 1876, Mr. Lumbers added to his business the " Great Devonshire Cattle Food," of which he is the sole proprietor and manufacturer. This preparation has achieved great success, the food being shipped to all parts of Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. In 1879 Mr. Lumbers again removed and purchased from Mr. John Irwin the premises 97 and 99 Adelaide Street East, which he now occupies, the building commanding a frontage of nearly fifty feet 011 one of the principal streets of the city. Mr. Lumbers is by birth a Canadian, havmg been born in Toronto.

E. G. Rust, 311 Yonge Street, is the manager for T. & J. N. Andrews, who are large flour manufacturers at Thornbury, Ontario, where they have for twenty years been engaged as general merchants. The Toronto branch was opened in 1879, and ,s doing a business of about two hundred dollars a day.

J. Williams, flour and feed merchant, 336 Queen Street West, was born in Toronto ft 1851. His father, Joshua Williams, was an upholsterer, and died in 1878, aged fifty years. Mr. Williams has been engaged in his present business some years, and is now handling about $30,000 worth of flour per annum. He is a Reformer, and a member of the Queen Street Methodist Church. In 1873 he married Miss Kate E. Woodhouse.

Isaac Williamson, flour and feed merchant, 136 Front Street East was born in Toronto in 1848. His father, Matthew Williamson, was born in Cumberland, England, and came to York, where he worked at his trade, that of a carpenter. In 1851 he removed to a farm of one hundred acres, being lot 17, in the 3rd concession of East York, where he died in 1877, sixty-seven years. His wife was Sarah Pearson. The subject of this sketch spent the first three years of his life in Toronto. From 1851 to 1879 he lived on his father's farm. In the latter year he came to Toronto and began business life with Messrs. Chapman & Sons, flour and feed and commission merchants, with whom he remained for four v'ears. In 1883 he began business for himself at his present location. He is married to Lydia, second daughter of Thomas Clark. Mr. Williamson is a Reformer in politics, and is a member of the A. F. and A. M. Fruit and Vegetables.

Mrs. Briton, fruit dealer, 188 Yonge Street. This well-known establishment, which takes high rank of its class in the cry, was founded b\ the late William Bilton in 1862. Mr. Bilton was born in Kingston in 1833, and came with his parents to Toronto at an early day. His father conducted the only first-class tailoring establishment then m Toronto. Mr. Bilton died in 1869, the business being still successfully earned on by his widow and two sons.

Charles Daldry, dealer in fruits and vegetables, 123 Kingston Road. He s a native of Ipswich, England, came to Canada in 1871, and has been a prominent dealer in his line since that time.

Furniture Dealers.

• Robert Leslie was born in Sutherlandshire, Scotland, August, 1812. Settled in what is now Toronto in 1826. His father, William Leslie;, died in Scotland in 1813, after which his mother married John Leslie, who died in Toronto in 1879. When they settled in Toronto the combined family consisted of eight children. Robert Leslie, the subject of this sketch, served his time at carpenter work 5 subsequently lived in the State of New York for six years, where, in 1837, he married Mary Ann House, and returned to Toronto in 1840, and engaged in contracting and building. In 1883 he added to his business furniture sale-rooms, at the corner of Strange Street and Kingston Road. He has had six sons and four daughters, all alive but one.

A. Robert Piper, furniture maker, 59 Adelaide Street West, started his business in 1880, and manufactures principally office furniture, lie employs six men.

William Roberts, 83 Yonge Street, manufacturer of office, library and all kinds of furniture, started his business in 1881. He employs four men.

James H. Samo, 189 Yonge Street, manufacturer of furniture in every sr. le, parlour sets, bedroom wardrobes, makes a specialty of fitting up banks and offices. Established first at Whitby in 1863, and in Toronto in 1871. His manufactory and warerooms are all on the same lot. Size 01 the cabinet shop is 50 x 30, two storeys liign, and his upholstery rooms 80 x 30 feet; finishing rooms, 86 x 50 feet ; warerooms, 100 x 22 feet ; two storehouses, 60 x 30 and 80 x 30. Employs thirty to forty hands in wholesale and retail.

H. A. Schomberg & Co., 635, 637, 639 Yonge Street, manufacturers of furniture and upholstered goods. The senior partner, H. A. Schomberg, was born m London, England, in 1824, and settled in Toronto in 1842. He established the business in 1863, previous to which time he had been foreman for Jacques & Hay for seventeen years. The junior partner, John Weston, was born in the City of Oxford, England, and served his time with the celebrated firm of Wm. Roddis & Co., of that city. He came to this country in 1866. and was engaged with Frank Holmes & Co., of Boston, Mass., and J. Jung & Co., of Brooklyn, N.Y.; was admitted to partnership in the above firm in 1878. The firm employ twelve hands, and purchase largely from other manufacturers.

Gents' Furnishings.

F. Cooper, gents' furnishings and manufacturer of shirts, 517 Queen Street West, established his business in 1871 at 129 Yonge Street with his brother. In 1876 he opened a store at 493 Queen Street West, and remained there: until 1880, when he removed to his present place of business. He was born in England and came to Toronto in 1871.

I. J. Cooper, shirt manufacturer, men's furnishings, etc., 109 Yonge Street, Toronto. In 1870 Mr. Cooper commenced business at 129 Yonge Street, opposite Temperance Street, where he remained six years, hut the premises being too small for his increasing trade he removed to the large and very prominent stand on the corner of Yonge and Adelaide Streets. Mr. Cooper makes specially the perfect-fitting "Imperial Shirt," carries one of the finest stocks of men's furnishings in Toronto, and imports his goods from the best manufacturers. Mr. Cooper was born in England, and came to Canada in i860 ; settled in Toronto 1865.

Hugh Matheson, merchant tailor and gents' furnishings, 283 Yonge Street. This business was established in 1848, by the firm of McKay 6c Matheson, and was continued to 1861, when the partnership was dissolved. Mr. Matheson then continued the business. In 1866 he removed to 16 King Street East, and in 1882 to his present quarters. Mr. Matheson was born in Scotland in 1826, and came to Canada in 1842. He studied medicine for three years at Hartford, and one year at Trinity College, and has practised more or less since 1848. In 1843 Mr. Matheson went to Connecticut and remained there for five years. He afterwards returned to Toronto, where he has since resided. He expects to relinquish his present business this year, and will then devote the whole of his time to the practice of medicine. Mr. Matheson is also the patentee of the following articles : Matheson's system of cutting coats, vests and pants without patterns, and takes less cloth to draft on; Matheson's Vital Magnetic Medicines, solids and liquids; Matheson's Improved Compound Oxygen, etc.

Robert Platt, gents' furnishings, and merchant tailor, 181 Yonge Street, was born in Kent, England, and came to Toronto in 1864. In 1871 he was engaged in his present business at 165 King Street East. In 1878-he retired from the trade and entered Thompson & Sons' "Mammoth House" as manager, which position he held until 1881. He then commenced business for himself in his present premises.

J. M. Treble, gents' furnishings and ladies' underwear. This business was established at Windsor in 1865. 70 Mr. Treble removed to Toronto, and located at 53 and 53£ King Street West. He makes a specialty of manufacturing shirts and ladies' underwear. His shirts are known as Treble's perfect-fitting French yoke shirts. Mr. Treble was born in England, and came to Canada in 1850. Before coming to Toronto he spent most of the time m London and St Thomas.

William Wilson, 563 Queen Street West, merchant tailor and gents' furnishings. This business was established in 1874 at 551 Queen Street West. Two years later Mr. Wilson removed to 533, and in 1883 to his present quarters, and is now opening a branch store at West Toronto Junction. He was born in Scotland in 1841, and came to Canada m 1868. In 1874 he settled in Toronto.

Grocers, Retail.

A. G. Boom, 379 Yonge Street, grocer and provision dealer, established in 1881. Employs one man. and one to run waggon.

H. T. Brown, groceries, crockery, glass, fruit, etc., 752 Yonge Street, corner of Yorkville Avenue, commenced business in 1878 at 47J Yonge Street, Yorkville, removing subsequently to his present address. Drives two waggons and employs six hands. Size of store and warehouse, 25 x 200 feet.

John Burrows, grocer, 226 Front Street, was born in Halton County, 1834, being the son of Henry and Ann Burrows of the same county. He followed farming until 1872, locating in Toronto the year following, where he opened the above store, and does a nice steady business. Mr. Burrows married Miss Elza Clark, also a native of Halton County, by whom he has five children.

The Central Co-operative Society (limited), 369 Yonge Street, established September, 1880. John W. Carter, Esq., President; A. E. Whinton, Esq., Secretary; George Welsh, Esq., Treasurer; and five Directors, compose the Board. The business is managed by Mr. William Davis, and a large trade is done in groceries, cutlery, crockery, sewing machines and general supplies. They have had, and are ha\ing, a healthy growth both as regards membership and sales, which in 1883 amounted to over §20,000. They have federated with the Manchester, England, Co-operative Wholesale Society, who have branch houses over the world, and do annually about §140,000,000 in business.

John Charters, corner of Alexander and Yonge Streets, dealer in general groceries, provisions, flour and feed, fruit, vegetables, oysters, etc. He commenced on the corner of Wood Street in a small way in 1872, removmg afterwards to his present locality, the store being four storeys high and 30 x 80 feet. Employs three clerks and runs two waggons.

James Duff, corner of Howard and Bleeker Streets, dealer in groceries, provisions and teas. Born in Toronto in 1838. Commenced the manufactory of boilers with Neil Currie & Co., on the Esplanade in 1871, and in 1877 commenced the grocery business, in which he is still engaged. Runs a delivery waggon, and does a good business.

H. A. Eastman, grocer, etc., 451 Queen Street West, established m 1880 his present business, which is rapidly improving. lie does a good retail business in all articles connected with the trade.

Louis Equi, 267 and 269 Yonge Street, general grocer and liquor dealer, also deals in flour and feed ; first established business on the corner of Bay and Richmond Streets in 1858, and m 1863 moved to his present location, where he employs five men and two waggons. He settled in Toronto in 1854.

James Good & Co., wholesale and retail grocers, wines and liquors, 220 Yonge Street. The business was established in 1869 by Mr. James Good, and employs one traveller and a staff of fourteen hands. The warehouse and store has a frontage of twenty feet, with a depth of one hundred and nine feet. The firm are also agents for "Labatt's," of London, Ontario, celebrated ales, in which they do a large trade. Mr. Good is a native of Fermanagh, Ireland, and came to Toronto in 1868.

Walter Grant, grocer and liquor merchant, corner of York and Adelaide Streets, commenced business ifl 1871 ;n a small way, which has since so greatly increased that at the present time he employs six men and runs two waggons. He is sole agent for George Sleemin, ale, porter and lager brewers, Guelph ; and also deals :n Pelee Island wine. He bottles his own beer.

James H. Greenshields, grocer, was born in Scotland in 1853. He emigrated to Canada in 1868, and entered the employment of Messrs. Swan Brothers, Toronto, and remained with this firm about nine years, after which he embarked in the grocery business on his own account, 1877. Mr. Greenshields' store is 300 King Street East, where he keeps a nice stock of goods and does a good family trade.

David Hunter, proprietor of the grocery and provision store, corner of Leslie Street and Kingston Road. His first start in business was in market gardening ; he carried on both businesses for two years, and in 1884 rented out the garden and devoted his attention to the grocery business. He married Catherine Ross, daughter of the late John Ross, an early settler in this county, and one of the victims of cholera.

Morgan J. Kelly, grocer and liquor dealer, was born 111 Toronto, being the youngest son of the late Morgan Kelly, a well-known hotel keeper m Toronto. Mr. Kelly, jun'r, received his early education at the De La Salle Institute. He took up the business formerly owned b) Thomas Lee & Co., and by his diligence and industry works a profitable undertaking-Mr. Kelly married, in i88t, Elizabeth Ryan, also a native of this city.

E. J. Kingsbury, grocer and provision dealer, 103 Church Street, was born in New York State, and commenced business in 1882, taking over the stock of J. J. Powell. Does a general trade ; has one waggon, and employs three hands. Trade returns about §30,000 annually.

J. W. Laing (J. W. Laing & Co., grocers) was born m Ireland, 1848. When only a few months old he came with his parents to Canada and settled in Toronto. He served his apprenticeship with j. Fleming & Co., and by degrees worked himself up to the position of manager. In 1865 he moved across the line and filled situations in Toledo and Philadelphia, remaining a few years and eventually returning to his old position of manager to Fleming & Co., Toronto. Not long after he commenced a grocery business m conjunction with Mr. Kinnear, which continued for r ne and a-half years. In 1881 the firm was dissolved, Mr. Kinnear retiring. Mr. Laing held to the business, however, and its rapid increase render .ng his premises inadequate for his requirements, he has recently taken possession of one of the largest and most commodious grocery warehouses in the city, 33 Front Street East.

The Liquor Tea Company, 446 and 448 Yonge Street, was established in Toronto in 1879. They have branch houses in Halifax and Winnipeg, and employ two travellers, who visit the provinces of Ontario and Quebec. The Toronto house is under the management of Mr. George Clark, a native of England, who came to Canada m 1881.

Thomas Lumbers, grocery and liquors, was born in the City of Toronto in 1850. From 1864 to 1875 he, in partnership with his brother, carried on a grocery business at 146 King Street East, and on a dissolution at the latter date, Mr. Thomas Lumbers continued the business on the same premises until 1881, when he removed to 152 King Street East, where, by earnest attention to a business conducted on cash principles, he has built up a good and increasing trade.

Peter Macdonald, grocer, 114 Church Street, was born in Argyle-shire, Scotland, in 1838, and settled in Toronto n 1850. In 1859 he commenced his present business.

Ira Marks, corner of Grosvenor and Oxford Streets, dealer in groceries, provisions, fruits, flour and feed. Established at 575 King Street West in 1883, and came to his present location late in the same year.

C. Maryland, corner of McCaul and D'Arcy Streets, general dealer :n groceries, provisions and liquors. Employs three clerks and runs a waggon.

As specialties, is agent for Sleemin's ale, of Guelph, and Little's Stilton cheese, manufactured in Renfrew, Perth County.

William Joseph McCormack, (McCormack Brothers, grocers and liquor dealers, 431 Yonge Street,) was born in Eglinton Village, and served a five years' apprenticeship to the carpentering and building. In 1861 he opened a grocery store in York\ille, but at the end of twelve months, being attacked with the gold fever, he emigrated to British Columbia and afterwards to San Francisco, spending upwards of seven years on the Paciiic Coast. In i86y he returned to Toronto and entered into partnership with his brother, the late Thomas G. McCormack, in the business which is still carried on under the name of McCormack Brothers. Their first premises were on the corner of Yonge and Elm Streets, but after a lapse of two years they erected the building in which the business is still carried on. In addition to their ordinary grocery and liquor trade a considerable business is done n the bottling line, for which the firm is specially noted. Mr. McCormack married, in 1872, Miss Barker, daughter of Captain Barker of Niagara, by whom he has three, children.

Andrew McFarren, grocer, corner of Queen and Sherbourne Streets, was born in Ireland in 1826, being the son of Andrew and Mary (Dougan) McFarren. lie came to Canada alone n 1847 and located at York, where he attended the Normal School for one year. The next two years he spent teaching school: one year on Yonge Street above the old Golden Lion Hotel, and one year in Scarboro' Township. Then, having laid by $200, he opened for himself in 1850 a small grocery store on King Street, where he remained until 1870, when he removed to his present location, where he has a good business. He also deals largely ui flour and feed. In 1850 Mr. McFarren married Martha Mulligan, from Bonbridge, County Down, Ireland, by whom he has three sons and one daughter. Two of his sons are in the grocery business with him. He is a Conservative, and a member of the Baptist Church.

Richard Nurse, 376 Church Street, general dealer .n groceries, provisions and liquors. Established on Yonge Street in 1861, and moved to his present location in 1867. Requires two delivery waggons and four men to do his business.

Walter Page, 704 Yonge Street, grocer, is a son of Charles Page, and was born in Toronto in 1861. He began business in 1884, previous to which time he was employed with Smith & Gemmel, architects. He married a daughter of Alexander Chisholm.

Adam Reddock, 279 Gerrard Street East, grocery and provision dealer, established on River Street in 1880, and carne to his present location in 1884. Has been engaged in the milk business since 1877.

Edward Kent Scholey, provision merchant, 35, 37 and 39 St. Lawrence Market, is a native of Lincolnshire, England, and emigrated to Canada in 1853. years he resided in Montreal, after which he came to Toronto and worked seven years with William Ramsay & Co. Commenced on his own account in 1865 n his present premises, where he does a good trade. Mr. Scholey was married in 1866 to Miss Piggott, a native of Toronto.

Francis Sheriff, dealer in groceries and liquors, was horn in Huntingdon. Province of Quebec, in 1848. He came to Toronto in the fall of 1870, and for five years was employed in the establishment of Fitch & Eby. He commenced a grocery business on his own account at the Ilaymarket, which he conducted for five years. He afterwards removed to his present address, 60 Front Street East, where he carries on a successful trade.

James Shields & Co., wholesale and retail dealers m groceries, wines, hquors and cigars. This business was established thirty years ago, the present members of the firm being John and James Shields, and has always been known under its present title. They employ two travellers, who visit every portion of the Province, and a staff of eleven men in the store and warehouse. They have a frontage of thirty feet on Yonge Street and a rear width of ninety feet, with a depth of one hundred and sixty feet, with three flats. They are sole agents for Holland & Co., of Fergus, and Taylor & Bates', of St. Catherines, celebrated ales.

W. J. Sylvester, Atlantic Tea House, 213 King Street East, commenced business in the St. Lawrence Market, 1881, and removed to his present store in 1883. Deals largely in tea—this being a specialty. He has one waggon and employs four hands, and does a trade of about §30.000 annually. Mr. Sylvester is a native of York Count)', and has resided m the city for the past eight years.

Gunsmiths.

George F. Oakley was born m England in 1846, and settled in Toronto in 1854. Being a gunsmith by trade he engaged with W. P. Marston, 132 Yonge Street. In 1883 he established a business for himself at 9 Adelaide Street East. He was married to Annie Jeffers, November 12, 1867, and has one child, Henry Walter, born July 8, 1870.

Hair Works.

JosErn Copley, dealer in hair goods, 238 Yonge Street, was born in Yorkshire, in England, 1816, and came to Toronto in 1862, with a little means, and established himself in business on Yonge Street in the manufacture of wigs and hair goods. He had previously learned the trade in Yorkshire, England. After his arrival in Toronto, he rented the building he at present occupies at 238 Yonge Street, and has built up a good business as an importer and manufacturer of all kinds of hair goods. Most of the raw material is brought from England. He is assisted by his wife, who was a Miss Midgley, from England, and by their united efforts they have been very successful in supplying the wants of a large class of customers, among the best people of Toronto and York.

Jahn & Schwenker, 75 King Street West. Proprietors of hair works. Have a full assortment of hair goods, Saratoga Waves, Star Waves, curls, switches, ladies' and gents' half and full wigs, ladies' head jewellery, etc. Established in 1882. Employ from five to eight hands; the business was formerly conducted by Mrs. Ellis.

Hardware.

James Aikenhead, of the firm of Aikenhead & Crombie, hardware merchants, was born in Kilkenny, Ireland, in 1817, being fourth in a family of eleven children. His father, Thomas A kenhead, was born in Kilkenny; he was a bookseller and stationer, and died in 1859. His mother was Eliza Beal, born in Thomastown, County Kilkenny; she died in her native county. Mr. Aikenhead learned the trade of a cabinet-maker, and worked at it for ten years; then he learned the hardware business in his uncle's establishment in Kilkenny. In 1849 he came to Canada and settled in Toronto, where he became employed in the establishment of Ridout, Bros. & Co. He afterwards became a partner in the business with Joseph and Percival Ridout, and A. T. Crombie. The Ridouts 11b mately retired, leaving the business m the hands of Messrs. Aikenhead & Crombie. In 1858, Mr. Aikenhead was married to Euza, daughter of Robert Higgin-bothain.

A. F. Crombie, of the firm of Aikenhead & Crombie, wholesale and retail hardware merchants, was born in the City of Aberdeen, Scotland. He acquired his first knowledge of business in the hardware establishment of Hugh Gordon & Co., better known as the " Copper Company," established in 1769, one of the most widely known manufacturing and importing houses in the north of Scotland. He emigrated to Toronto in 1850, and was in charge of one of the departments in the firm of Thomas Ilaworth, in the building afterwards occupied by the Leader. He left him in 1858, and went into the Birmingham, Sheffield and Woolverhampton warehouse of Ridout Brothers & Co., and remained there until he became a partner with Mr. J. D. Ridout and Mr. James Aikenhead on the retirement of Mr. Percival Ridout in 1867. The present partnership was formed in 1876 on the retirement of the late respected Mr. J. D. Ridout. This business was established in 1830 by Geo. P. and J. D. Ridout, in the building then known as the "Wakefield Auction Mart," which was found to be too small for their business, and in 1833 the present premises were erected and occupied in the following year.

John R. Barron, dealer in house-furnishings, etc., 241 Parliament Street, was born in Bowmanville, and is a son of Mr. John Barron, King Street East.

John L. Bird, hardware dealer, 313 Queen Street West, is an Englishman by birth, having first seen the light of day at Bury St. Edmunds, in the County of Suffolk. He came to Canada in 1851, and settled in Toronto, where he has resided ever since. Since that time he has seen something of the ups and downs of life in this city ; and now that Toronto is on the high tide of prosperity, it is something for him to say that he has joined in it. He commenced in the hardware business in 1880, and notwithstanding the great amount of competition in this line it has proven a successful venture with him. The first year his turn-over far exceeded his expectations, the second year it was doubled, while the third year it was doubled again, unti1 now it stands as the leading retail hardware business in the west end of the city. Entering the commodious store one cannot but be struck with the large and well-selected assortment of goods there visible. Builders' general hardware, paints, oils, glass, cutlery, plated goods, wheelbarrow's, grindstones, contractors' supplies, wire fencing, in fact everything from a needle to an anchor, as Mr. Bird himself tersely put it. In all branches of the bus; less he keeps his stock replenished, never allowing it to run down. His trade is chiefly confined to the city, although he does not want for country custom. The people of the west end are fortunate in having a store with such a well-selected stock of hardware to choose from right in their midst. In his charges Mr. Bird will be found reasonable, and no purchaser can complain that he does not get fair value for his money.

G. Bottom, hardware, etc., 258 Queen Street West, was born in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, in 1833. After spending twelve years in New Zealand, his adventurous spirit brought him to Canada in 1872. He remained in Montreal some eight or nine months, when, desirous of a change, he went to Ottawa. In 1874 he came to Toronto, and entered upon the business he at present successfully conducts at the above address.

W. M. Cooper, hardware merchant and manufacturer, 69 Bay Street, is a native of Newcastle, England, being the son of a large farmer who lived in that district until his death in 1846. He had joined the reserve militia during the French war, in which he held the rank of captain and adjutant. Mr. Cooper was apprenticed and had eighteen years' experience in Birmingham, England, part of which time he was partner in a large hardware manufacturing establishment. Me came to Canada in 1870, and established himself in business is Toronto, in the above line, where he is also engaged in manufacturing specialties and importing a superior class of lire arms for the Canadian market. He has been since 1875 a volunteer officer, being gazetted ensign, and :n 1878 was placed in command of No. 9 Company, 10tli Royals, as first lieutenant. He retired in 1880, retaining his rank, and in 1882 was gazetted captain of No. 1 Company, 12th battalion, York Rangers, Head Quarters, St. Matthew's Ward. In 1875 and 1879 Mr. Cooper was selected as a member of the Wimbledon team. He was a member of the 1st Warwickshire Rille volunteers before he came to Canada for about nine years, and was six times a representative of that corps at Wimbledon.

William J. Knowles, house-furnishings and general hardware, 430 Yonge Street, was born in Guelph Township, and commenced a successful and increasing business at the above address, which he has carried on for seven years.

W. II. Sparrow & Co., house-furnishings, hardware, etc., 87 Yonge Street. The father of the present head of this firm was from Clornnel, Ireland, and when he settled in Toronto, situated the present business, which he successfully conducted until his death, about one year ago. His son continues the business under the able and efficient management of Mr. Charles S. McDonald, together frith a staff of workmen for the manufacture of tinware. The firm import saleable articles from England, including mangles and water filters, and their average yearly sales of goods amount to from $30,000^0 §40,000.

F. W. Unitt, general hardware merchant, 362, 364 and 366 Queen Street West, was born at Newcastle, Ontario, it* 1845, and commenced business as above in 1868. He has taken great interest m volunteer matters, and was gazetted ensign in the "Royals "„ in April, 1873, lieutenant in Apr 1, 1874, adjutant, December, 1875, and captain in July, 1878; retiring with his rank in 1880. In municipal matters he has also taken a prominent part, having been Alderman for St. Stephen's Ward in 1876-7. He was School Trustee for St. Patrick's Ward in 1875-6.

Harness Makers.

John C. Albery (late of Horsham, Sussex, England), 802 Yonge Street, harness-maker and saddler, established in 1875, being tfie oldest in North Toronto. Employs two men. Keeps on sale complete assortment of all kinds of harness, collars, whips, brushes, etc. Settled in Toronto in 1870.

William Christie, harness and saddle maker, 211 King Street East, established his business during the present year and employs two hands. The premises have a frontage of 16 x 100 feet deep. Mr. Christie has been a resident of the city for two years. His trade is confined principally to Toronto.

W. P. Keams, saddle, harness and collar manufacturer. Business established in 1870, first located at King and George for several years, then removed to his present location, No. 63 George Street, where he employs five hands. Mr. Keams was born in Ireland, and has been a resident of Toronto for the past twenty-nine years.

W. A. Kirkpatrick & Son, saddle and harness manufacturers. Business established in 1856 at Thornhill, where they remained until 1880, then removed to this city, and are now located at 181 King Street East Their show rooms have a frontage of 25 x 130 feet m depth. Employ a staff of from eight to ten hands. Mr. Kirkpatrick was born m Ireland, and came to Canada in 1854, has been a resident of Toronto for the past four years.

Lugsdin & Barnett, saddle, harness and trunk manufacturers, 115 Yonge Street. This business was established in 1868. Their show rooms have a frontage of 35 x 140 feet in depth and five storeys high. They employ twenty-five hands, and import a fine class of riding and driving goods, making a specialty of sole leather trunks, for which they have taken the first prize for three years in succession. They also hold two medals for ladies' and gents' saddles, one received at the " Centennial " at Philadelphia, and one at Paris in France. The firm manufacture largely .in saddles and harness, and do an extensive export trade to the United States and other ports. Mr. Lugsdin is of English birth, and came to Canada at an earl)' day. Mr. Barnett was born in Scotland, and came to Canada and took up his residence in Toronto in 1856.

John Saunders, manufacturer and dealer in saddles, harness and trunks, 485 Queen Street West. The business was established in 1880, and at present he employs three hands. His store has a frontage of 16 x 100 feet, with three flats, his trade being chiefly confined to the city. Mr. Saunders has been a resident of Toronto for the past twenty years.

S. G. Saywell, manufacturer of saddles and harness, trunks, etc., 165 King Street West, established his business in 1879. He employs four men.

Andrew Smith, manufacturer and dealer in saddlery, harness and trunks, 690 Queen Street West. Established in 1857, and has occupied his present premises since 1859. His store has a frontage of 23 x 44 feet deep; and he employs five hands in the manufacture of harness. Mr. Smith is a Canadian by birth, having been a resident of the city since 1847.

J. Swallow, manufacturer of collars and harness ; business established in 1882, in Mallandine's Block, Riverside. Employs three hands. The store has a frontage of twenty feet. Mr. Swallow was born in Pickering, Ontario, and has been a resident of Toronto and vicinity for the last fifteen years.

Hatters and Furriers.

James Lugsdin, wholesale and retail dealer in hats, caps and furs, 39 Yonge Street, established himself m 1867 at 101 Yonge Street, removing afterwards to 74 King Street West, where he remained until his occupation of the present premises. The warehouse has a frontage of 52 x 45 feet, and is rive storeys high. He employs three travellers, who visit Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritime Provinces. He also employs some sixty hands in the fur manufacture, and a staff of ten clerks. Mr. Lugsdin was born in England, and came to Toronto in 1852.

J. & J. Lugsdin, hatters and furriers, 101 Yonge Street. This firm s composed of John and Joseph, who have carried on business as practical hatters and manufacturing furriers in this stand for upwards of seventeen years. They are the oldest firm now doing business 11 the block from Adelaide to King Street, and, strange to say, this is the only one. that has stood the "ups and downs" of trade during that time. All the furs they offer for sale are of their own manufacture, personally supervised by the senior partner, who has had twenty-five years' experience. They employ about twenty-five hands all the year round for this branch of their business. Having established a reputation for making a first class article, then trade has steadily grown, and for some years past they have done one of the leading businesses in their line. They secured first prize medals for ladies' and gents' fine furs at the Industrial Exhibition, against all competitors. The partners are both popular men, and are always to the front with open hand, whenever called upon to aid deserving ones, less fortunate than themselves. Their store does not present the most imposing appearance from the front, and the amount and quality of the goods turned out of their place would lead one to suppose their premises were much larger; 'out appearances are deceitful, as most of their room lies at the back, where they have a large building four storeys high, in which are their work and store rooms.

Joseph Rogers, manufacturer and retail dealer in hats, caps and furs, located at 141 King Street East. Manufactures goods solely for his retail trade, employing seven hands. This business was established in 1830 by his father, C. K. Rogers, wdio is also a native of this city. The grandfather, Joseph Rogers, came to Canada from Ireland about 1805. He was one of the early pioneers and was the first hatter here, establishing himself in the business about 1815. He controlled this line of trade many years, and started his business on the smallest begining, and it has increased steadily to the present time. This is, without doubt, the oldest business house in this city.

Hides and Skins.

James Lowdon, 69 Cameron Street, dealer in hides. He commenced to deal in 1872, and has been very successful in his business.

Hotel-Keepers.

R. W. Abeel, proprietor of the popular hotel known as the "Elephant and Castle," corner of Queen and Parliament Streets, is a native of Long-hope, Gloucestershire, England, and came to this city in 187:. lie was engaged at his trade, that of wood-turner, for some time, and later on carried on a wood-yard near his present location. He was afterwards burned out, and he bought the hotel business near his present stand. He has been Returning Officer of St. David's Ward for the past ten years.

John Ayre, proprietor "Lake View House," corner of Winchester and Parliament Streets. This is one of the pleasantest public, resorts in the east end of the city, and is deservedly well patronized. Mr. Ayre has lately built in connection with the hotel a large and commodious lodge-room and public hall, in which several Friendly Society Lodges hold meetings. The hall is 75 x 23 feet, and the size of the whole building is 125 x 125 feet. An additional attraction in the shape of a pleasant summer garden is much appreciated. There are also a fine billiard-room and bowling-alleys in connection with the hotel.

Elijah Bailey, hotel proprietor, was born in Manchester, England, in 1832. He emigrated to Canada in 1852, and settled first in Kingston, and for some time was employed on the Grand Trunk Railway as locomotive fireman, receiving promotion afterwards to the position of engineer, which he filled for eight and a-half years. He was appointed foreman in the Grand Trunk Round-house at Toronto, a position which he satisfactorily filled for two and a-half years. During a portion of the time he was employed by the Grand Trunk he kept an hotel called ''The Manchester House," King Street West. He afterwards occupied "The Old Ship," corner Douro and Tecumseth Streets, and "The Golden Kite" on Front Street. In 1877 he opened " The Lady of the Lake " Hotel, 21 George Street, where he still remains. Mr. Bailey was t^icc married; his present wife's maiden name was Agnes Hart.

Francis Summerville Berry, hotel proprietor, was born near Callendar, Perthshire, Scotland, December 23rd* 1843. He came to Canada in 1853, and stayed three years in Quebec., where he was employed for a few months at a shingle machine, afterwards taking a butler's position. He gave the latter up at the end of nine months, and betook himself to Ander-sonville, and there learned the trade of rope-maker. The firm failing in the year 1856, he came to Toronto, which place he made his point of departure to different towns in the neighbouring counties, putting his hand to a variety of ndustries. In 1868 he was again in Toronto, and worked for a short time as bar-keeper. From 1871 until 1880 he kept hotel on King Street. After another short absence he returned to the city and commenced a grocery business near John Street, from which he migrated to an hotel in the Haymarket. In 1882 he moved to the "Prince Arthur Hotel," on King Street West, where he still remains. In 1871 Mr. Berry married a daughter of Mr. Wm. Brandon, Simcoe County, a native of the north of Ireland.

Thomas J. Best, proprietor of "The Woodbine Park Club House." Mr. Best has been in the hotel business all his life; his father, Thomas Best, having been for many years proprietor of "The Bay Horse Hotel," Mr. Best, jun'r, succeeded him on his retirement. I. J. Best afterwards took the "Globe Hotel," changing its name to the "Bay Horse"; this he ran a year and a-half, when he leased and took possession of the handsome and commodious place above mentioned.

Charles Brewer, "The Canadian Hotel," Maud Street. This house was erected in 1876, and in 1883 was taken possession of by the present proprietor, who is a native of Bristol, Somersetshire, England, and came to America in 1856. Previous to his settlement in Toronto in 1875, he had spent the time conducting hotels in the United States. He established himself at his present location in 1883, and is prepared to attend to the wishes and comforts of the travelling public.

R. Dissettr, hotel proprietor, was born at Newmarket, York County, >n 1848. His commencement in business was at Orillia, in partnership with Mr. Robert Hay, where after nine years' successful career he accumulated a considerable competency in the harness trade. He came to Toronto in 1875, and for a time was engaged in property speculations. In 1875 he opened the hotel known as the "Crosby Hall," on the Esplanade, opposite the Union Station. Here his attention to the comfort and requirements of his patrons has necessitated a considerable enlargement of his premises to meet the wants of his increasing business, and the hotel is now capable in ordinary times of accommodating ninety guests; and on special occasions is prepared to receive almost double that number.

James E Maney, hotel proprietor, was born in the English metropolis in 1831, and served his tune in the carriage department of Woolwich Arsenal. When only eighteen years of age he was despatched to the Barbary Coast, to superintend the erection of gun-carriages and batteries, and on his return home in 1853 at once detailed on the siege train department for service in the Crimea. The transport in which he sailed was attacked with cholera at Gibraltar, and after losing half its complement in the journey from that port to Malta, eventually landed its men and stores at Varna, only to swell the list of victims who perished there from that terrible scourge. The heroism of our soldiers during those calamitous months is immortalized in the pages of history. After encountering the difficulties of Alma, and the more heavier work and danger connected with the siege of Sebastopol, and the capture of Kertch, in the Sea of Azov, Mr. Emaney was able to return home at the close of the war, to receive at the hands of his countrymen in after life that respect which is always accorded to those whose lives have been imperilled in the defence of their country's honour. He subsequently came to Canada, and for twenty years conducted a carriage business at Prince Albert, in North Ontario, after which he moved to Toronto, 1881, and commenced hotel-keeping 011 the premises he at present occupies, 172 King Street, where by attention to the wants of his patrons he secures a fair amount of custom.

Alexander Gibb, hotel proprietor, was born on Yonge Street, in York Township, ia 1840, being the eldest son in the family of the late John Gibb. He was brought up on his father's farm, and after arriving at years of maturity he embarked in the business of dairyman. During this period he was elected to and accepted the Deputy-Reeveship of York Township, in which office he continued for five years. Mr. Gibb is at present proprietor of the "Bay Horse Hotel", 163 Yonge Street, where seventy-five to eight} guests can be comfortably housed.

William Green, "Simcoe House," corner of Front and Simcoe Streets, is a native of Oxfordshire, England, and came to Canada in 1857, settling first in Belleville, afterwards removing to Quebec, and thence to Ottawa, where he took charge of the Ottawa Citizen, which he conducted for ten years, and was manager of the Government Printing Office for five years. He then removed to St. Catharines, and kept the " Russell House " for four years, eventually taking possession of his present hotel. Mr. Green is a printer, anil learned his trade in Birmingham, England.

John Gregg, hotel proprietor, owns the "Gregg House," corner of Queen and McCaul Streets. He opened the house in 1875, and has since carried on a good business. The " Gregg House " has accommodation for twenty-five guests. Mr. Gregg was born in Ireland, and when twenty-two years of age went to New York, where he remained a short time, finally coming to Canada. He first settled in Kemptville, and then removed to Toronto.

William Hall, hotel proprietor, was born at Deptford, England, in 1853, and came to this country with his parents in 1858. Before embarking in the hotel business he had occupied responsible positions in the leading hotels in Toronto, Niagara, and Madison, Wisconsin, U.S. His hotel is situate at 170 Queen Street West, formerly known as Jones' Hotel, where he does a good trade. In 1876 Mr. Hall married Georgina Jones, a daughter of his predecessor in the business.

William Hancock, hotel proprietor, was born in 1843 at Bosworth, Leicestershire, England, within two miles of the historic battlefield where the English King, Richard III., was killed. Air. Hancock came to Canada in 1871, and wras employed in the household of the then Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario (Sir William Howland) as butler. Leaving this position he went to work in the mechanical department of the Toronto, Grey and Bruce Railway. He was afterwards steward of the Royal Canadian, U. E., and Toronto Yacht Clubs, remaining with the latter club two years. He commenced in the hotel business first on East Market Square, afterwards removed to the "Simcoe House," corner of Victoria and Richmond Streets, and eventually settled down at his present premises, 252 King Street East. Mr. Hancock married before he came to Canada, his wife being also from Leicestershire.

John Holderness, proprietor of the "Albion Hotel," was born m Hull, Yorkshire, England, n 1834. He engaged in farming there, and on his arrival in Canada in 18G6 followed the same occupation for a short time. Afterwards he worked as hostler at the Black Horse Hotel for six years, and then embarked in the hotel business at Woodbridge. Returning to Toronto at the end of about three years he bought out the Black Horse Hotel, and successfully ran that for nine years. In 1880 Mr. Holderness purchased the property of the "Albion," and after laying §95,000 out in enlarging, fitting and furnishing, has an hotel which for comfort and convenience is equal to any in Toronto. He can accommodate three hundred and lifty guests, and has excellent facilities for dining a great number.

Thomas Holmes, "Red Lion " Hotel, Yorkville, is a native of Ireland, and came to Canada in 1840, settling in the Gore of Toronto, where for eleven years he worked at farming. About this time he married Marv McCourt, also from Ireland, and then opened an hotel at Thistleton, in the Township of Etobicoke. He afterwards kept the "Albany House" for over twenty-two years, removing in 1852 to his present establishment, which he bought from Robert Nixon. The "Red Lion" Hotel is one of the oldest in Yorkville, and under the efficient management of Mr. Holmes is well patronized.

W. J. Howell, hotel proprietor, was born in New York City in 1844. he came to Toronto in 1872, previous to which time he had conducted an hotel in the city of his nativity. He purchased the "Woodbine" on Yonge Street, which place he kept for four years. He then, in conjunction with Mr. Pardee, laid down the Woodbine Race Track, Kingston Road, sinking about $19,000 in the enterprise. It proved a failure, however, the public interest in the affair being small. Disposing of the track to Mr. Joseph Duggan, Mr. Howell remained out of business for some time, but in September, 1883, commenced hotel again at his present premises, 448 Yonge Street, the "Avenue House," where he can accommodate thirty guests. He was married in Toronto in 1871.

Robert Irving, proprietor of the "Pioneer Hotel" at Seaton Village, is a native of the Orkney Islands, Scotland. He came out 11 May, 1873, and at once settled in Toronto. He learned in his youth the trade of blacksmith, and followed the same here up to September, 1883, when he leased and took possession of the above-named house, where he is doing a good local and constantly improving business. This is one of the oldest houses in this location, having been established over thirty years ago.

E. A. Jones, proprietor of the "Morin House," 483 Kingston Road, is one of the few individuals who, in spite of all obstacles that misfortune places before them, have by resolution, courage and energy, emerged from times of difficulty and failure that would have disheartened most men. He was born in Vermont, his people having originally come from Wales. His grandfather was. killed in the "Revolutionary War;" and when he was thirteen years of age his mother died, and he at once started out to face the trials and discomforts of the world alone. He went to Livonia, N. J., and remained there live years; from thence to Kalamazoo, Michigan, where he was engaged in an hotel; then returned to New York State, and drove a stage about fourteen years. He came to Canada in 1855, and commenced as omnibus proprietor, owning twelve 'busses and twenty-four horses, but about two years afterwards was burned out, and raided on the corner of Duke and George Streets by cabmen and carters. By this outrage he lost the whole of his vehicles. He managed, however, to continue his business until the introduction of Street Railways, but on their advent he found his occupation in this direction gone, and from that time forward until 1881 he was variously engaged, subsequently renting his present place of business.

John Kemp, proprietor of the "Commercial Hotel,'" Jarvis Street, was born in England in 1835. He emigrated to Canada when twenty years of age, settled in Toronto, and for a number of years followed farming and hostlering. In the year i860 Air. Kemp commenced hotel-keeping, first at Weston for nine years, then at Yorkville for eight years ; quite recently he removed to his present locality, where he does a large and lucrative business. His accommodation both for "man and beast" is excellent, his stables surpassing any m the city. He is also greatly interested in the importation of draught stallions, having sold lately the famous Clyde stallion "Norseman," which he considers one of the best horses of its kind in Canada.

H. U. Layton, proprietor of the " Caer Howell Hotel," was born in the building in which he still resides, his father, the late Henry Layton, having been proprietor from 1844 until the time of his death. The house is well-known and popular as a summer resort. Mr. Layton married in 1878, his wife being Florence Jane Mitchell.

William Ledley, hotel proprietor, was horn in Stockport, Cheshire, England, in 1832. He emigrated to Canada in 1870, and came direct to Toronto, where he at once entered upon the hotel business, having had previous experience in Manchester, England. Mr. Ledley occupies1 the same premises now as when he first commenced, 493 Yonge Street, the house bearing the name of its present proprietor, and having accommodation for twenty-five guests. Mr. Ledley married before he left England, and a son and daughter, the issue of his marriage, remain ;n England.

Thomas Lee, hotel proprietor, 423 Gerrard Street, is the step-son of the late Morgan Kelly (one of the old hotel-keepers of the city) who opened out on Jarvis Street in 1851, subsequently building, on the corner of Gerrard and River Streets, the hotel known as the "Shamrock." He died in 1860, and for two years the place was carried on by his widow, but her death taking place in 1862, the business has since been carried on by the present proprietor. The hotel has a frontage of sixty-six feet.

Henry Lemon was born in England, in 1834, and came with his father ami family to Toronto in 1841. His father conducted an hotel on Yonge Street, and the son remained at home till 1857, when he went to Thornhill, and commenced hotel-keeping on his own account. At this he remained until 1879, when he returned to this city and opened the hotel he at present occupies, 158 King Street. Mr. Lemon married in 1857 Sarah Miller, daughter of the late Nathan Miller, who was well-known in his section.

William Lush, hotel proprietor, is a native of Dorsetshire, England, where he was born in 1847. He came to Canada with his family in 1875, and at once entered the service of the Hon. D. L. Macpherson, as butler, having previously occupied similar positions in England. After a few months he was employed at the "Toronto Club," first as head waiter, but afterwards was promoted to the position of steward, which he occupied for three and a-half years. In 1882 he embarked in the hotel known as "Marble Hall," 66 Jarvis Street, where he is working up a respectable trade. Mr. Lush married in England Maria Louise Southgate.

John McCaffrey, hotel proprietor, is a native of Ireland, and was brought up on his father's farm in Fermanagh, Ireland. He emigrated to Canada in 1865, and 011 his arrival in Toronto joined the 10th Royals, and was present at the skirmish with the Fenians at the time of the raid. He afterwards followed the employment of a baker, and also entered the service of the Street Railway Company for six years, and then went to Ireland for a brief trip. Upon his return to Toronto he opened the "Rose and Crown," 148 Front Street East, where he can room forty guests and at the, present time averages seventy daily at dinner. He married in 1870 Ann Jane Johnstone, a native of Enniskillen.

Andrew McCully, hotel proprietor, was born m North Augusta, near Brockville, 1851. He was the youngest son of Henry McCully, who removed his family from Augusta to Bishop's Mills in 1857, where they still reside. At the latter place Andrew learned the trade of shoemaker, which he continued to follow until he entered upon the hotel business. In 1871 he came to Toronto, and in 1873 lie married Amelia Marsh, daughter of Leonard Marsh. The hotel which Mr. McCully conducts is situated on the corner of Jarvis and Front Streets, and has accommodation for thirty guests. He has succeeded in working up a very good and paying business and tries in every way to make his guests comfortable.

James McFakland, deceased, was a native of County Tyrone, Ireland and while yet young sought a prospective fortune m Canada. In 1870 he married and subsequently entered the hotel business. He opened the "Royal Arms," which he run for twelve years until his death. His widow Christiana McFarland, still carries on the business; the house being able to accommodate from thirty to forty guests.

Francis McGarry, proprietor of the "Duke of Connaught's Hotel, 200 Front Street East, was born in the County of Leitrim, Ireland, m 1834. His father was a farmer, and young McGarry's early days were spent upon the farm. Probably not appreciating the monotonous life of rural labour he entered the service of the " Irish Constabulary," and for seven years formed one of that body, whose achievements are closely connected with the political history of Ireland. Mr. McGarry emigrated to Canada in 1861, and for a short time took up his residence near Guelph, but on coming to Toronto he immediately joined the police force, and continued in that body during five and a-half years as constable and detective. He then removed to Ottawa and joined the police there, but owing to poor health returned to-Toronto and opened a grocery and liquor store at the corner of Dorset and King Streets. He remained here about one year, and then opened an hotel on Church Street, stayed three years; and at the end of that time moved to the Esplanade, where he remained five years. In October, 1877, Mr. McGarry purchased his present premises, and has accommodation for twenty guests. In 1869 he married Mary Kehoe, by whom he has si v children.

James McGinn was born in the County Armagh, Ireland, in 1835, and settled in Toronto in 1845. In 1861 he went to California. After residing there three years he returned to Toronto and commenced the hotel business in the "Golden City Hotel", King Street West. In 1871 he went into the cigar trade, in which he continued until 1875, when he opened the "Royal Billiard Rooms," 79 King Street West. In 1879 he again went into the hotel business at 102 Bay Street, where he still remains.

John Mallindine, was born in Yorkshire, England, m 1837, and came to Canada in 1859. He located in Toronto, and engaged in the upholstery business on King Street East, which he carried on up to 1873. H-e purchased vacant lots on the corner of Grant Street and Kingston Road, and erected his present block, comprising an hotel and three stores. Mr. Mallindine carries on the hotel business, as well as a shoe store and butcher trade. He has been identified with the improvements in St. Matthew's Ward, having built several fine houses in tl 's locality. In the rear of his hotel he has an Armoury 28 x 16, and a Hall of 22 x 50 feet. His buildings have a frontage of 200 feet on the Kingston Road and Grant Street.

James Melick, proprietor of the "Alexander Hotel," 102 Queen Street West, was born ,-n Toronto, 1846, and is the eldest son of the late James Melrick, who was one of the first to run the stage from Toronto to Holland Landing. Mr. James Melrick, inn r, has been in the hotel business since a boy, and was employed at the Rossin House at the time of the lire, on that occasion having a narrow escape, only being saved by leaping from one of the upper windows. He next went to the Queen's Hotel, remaining there three years. He was in Chicago from 1865 to 1877, and on his return to Toronto during the latter year he engaged as manager for Edward Hanlan (the famous oarsman) at his hotel on the Island, remaining with him until he began on his own account :n 1882. Mr. Melick's experience enables him to conduct his business with success, at the same time paying every attention to the comfort and requirements of his patrons. He has accommodation for forty guests.

James Nealon, grocer and liquor dealer, was born at Newmarket, in the County of York, :n 1850. lie was the youngest n a family of ten children, and the only one of the family born in Canada. In early life he was apprenticed with Henry Mintern, of Newmarket, to learn the business of carpenter. At the expiration of his term he worked at his trade in Toronto for three years, and afterwards for two years in Rochester, U.S. Returning again to Toronto in 1875, he commenced the grocery and liquor business on the north east corner of Wilton Avenue and Sumach Streets. He remained here eighteen months, and then embarked in his present prosperous business at 197 and 199 King Street East, which is the largest of its kind in Toronto. In 1876 Mr. Nealon married Mary Riordan, adopted daughter of Mr. Thomas O'Connor, of Balmy Beach, east of the Woodbine race-course.

Patrick O'Connor, hotel proprietor, was born near the Village of Nobleton. in King Township, York County, in 1848. His first commencement in business was as junior clerk in O'Hagan & Company's grocer establishment at Stratford, where he only remained six months." lbs nex< employment was with William Munsie, of Nobleton, and on the latter removing^ to Woodbridge, he went to that place with him. In April, 1875, Mr. O'Connor came to Toronto and entered the employment of Mr. Thomas O'Connor, King Street East, with whom he remained about four years. He afterwards commenced business for himself on Front Street wear the Haymarket. "The O'Connor House" is well-known, and in its line of business is unsurpassed in the city. Mr. O'Connor married, in 1877, Marv Ann Cahill.

M. O'Halloran, proprietor of the "Deer Park Hotel," is a native of this city, being the son of Michael O'Halloran, who emigrated from Ireland in 1832, and for many years kept an hotel on the present site of the Ontario Bank, which was known as the "Cove of Cork." He afterwards bought some land on which he built the "Deer Park Hotel" in 1862. He died in August, 1865; the place was then leased and the family removed to the city. In 1878 Mr. O'Halloran returned to the hotel which his father had erected, where he has since continued to reside.

Joseph O'Hara, hotel proprietor, was born in the City of Toronto, in 1853. His early education was received at the School of the Christian Brothers. He commenced business in the dry-goods trade, but left it for a few months' experience in the lumbering districts. He returned again to Toronto, when he entered the firm of T. Walls & Co., where he remained six years. lie afterwards took a position in the establishment of Hughes Bros., and stayed there five years. Leaving Toronto, he commenced to travel for Messrs. Skelton Bros., of Montreal, and continued to do so until 1884, when he started the "Continental Hotel," corner of Simcoe and Wellington Streets. This property Air. O'Hara owns, and its close proximity to the Union Station renders ;t very convenient for travellers. It is a well conducted and comfortable house, entirely new, with all the latest appliances, heating apparatus, etc., and should be well patronized.

T. H. O'Neil, hotel and restaurant, 60 Adelaide Street East, is a native of County Mayo, Ireland, being the fifth son of James O'Neil, land agent. T. H. O'Neil came to Canada in 1841, and m 1848 established his present business.

John Orbison, proprietor of the "Ulster House," 90 Esplanade Street, was born in Philadelphia, U. S. His parents were natives of the Emerald Isle, and at the age of eight years he accompanied them back to their native land. In County Down he received his education and, later, was instructed n the trade of a machinist. In 1873 he returned to this continent and worked in various places at several branches of industry. He was employed for six years on the Nipissing Railway, 011 leaving which he entered into the hotel business, having previously married Elizabeth Leslie, daughter of Joseph Lesbe, Highland Creek, Scarboro' Township. On a pressure Mr. Orbison can well accommodate fifty guests, and generally his success in business is to be attributed to the comfort with which he always provides his patrons.

John Oulcott, proprietor of the "Eglinton House," Yonge Street, is a native of Staffordshire, England, and came to .Canada in 1863. He was with Thomson & Burns as china packer seven years, after which he opened a crockery store on Yonge Street, and continued in the business until 1872. He kept the "Globe'' hotel at Carlton about five years, subsequently taking charge of the "Dovercourt Road Hotel" and keeping the same until 1882. In 1883 he built the large and commodious three-storey brick hotel, which has a frontage of forty-eight feet and a depth of one hundred feet, with large sheds and stables, and took possession the same year. This house is a credit to the locality in which it is situate, and stands on the site of "Montgomery's Hotel," one of the most historic spots in this vicinity.

Joseph Power, proprietor of the "Power House," corner of King and Brock Streets, was born in Halifax, N. S., and has been a resident of Toronto since 1854. First kept the hotel known as the "Royal George," corner of Queen and Bathurst, subsequently removing to the "Hamilton House," King Street, and in 1879 he erected his present large and commodious hotel, which has a frontage of 25 x 125 feet, and is three storeys in height.

Alex. Purse is a native of the North of Ireland and came to Canada with his father, Wm. Purse, in 1845. He has been identified with hotel interests .n this city for the last twelve years. His place of business is located on Adelaide Street West, and is known as "Purse's Hotel." Retired in 1881.

R. H. Reily, proprietor of the "City Hotel," is the eldest son of Joseph Reid, who came to Toronto in 1837. He was colour-sergeant in the 66th Regiment, and was in the hotel business from 1854 to 1870. He died in 1873. K- his son, has been engaged n the hotel business for the past five years. His hotel is situate at the corner of Front and Simcoe Streets, has a frontage of 40 x 75 feet, and is three storeys in height.

Samuel Richardson, hotel-keeper, is from the County of Antrim. Ireland, being the eldest son of Robert Richardson, a man well-known in that county. Samuel served n the 13th Hussars from 1858 to 1869, having during that time seen a great deal of foreign service. His regiment came to Canada m 1866, and on its being ordered home again two years later, through the medium of friends in Toronto (his period of service not having expired) he was allowed to remain in Canada as a military settler. The first position he obtained was in connection with the survey party on the Nipissing Railway, with whom he continued until the running of the first train. In 1871 he returned to Toronto and commenced the hotel business on Teraulay Street, where he remained two years. He then purchased the property on which his present hotel stands, corner of King and Brock, known as the "Richardson House," where, when necessity arises, he can room nearly one hundred guests. To industry and perseverance Mr. Richardson owes his continued success: possessing nothing on his arrival, he is now worth $40,000. He was married in 1872 to Emma Moore, who was born in the County of Grey, though of English parentage; her father still living in that district.

Wolstan Riley, proprietor of the "Victoria Hotel," at the corner of Caer Howell Street, was born at the Cape of Good Hope. His father, William Riley, was for many years a cattle dealer at that port during the Kaffir war. The son visited England in 1856, and soon after came to America and was three years in Buffalo ; in 1859 he came to this city and carried on the butcher, business for two years. He was one year at sea on the "Anglo-Saxon," and was shipwrecked and washed ashore at Cape Blaght, Newfoundland. He then came back to Ontario and engaged in the hotel business. He has kept seventeen different hotels, thirteen of which were in this city. He established himself at his present location m 1882.

Susanna Rorinson, proprietress of the hotel known as the "Gladstone House," situated at 1068 Queen Street West, was born in Lincolnshire, England, in 1825, and came to Canada with her grandfather n 1837. She lived with her grandfather until her marriage with Mr. Nixon Robinson, brewer, of Toronto, which took place in 1846. Mrs. Robinson has had considerable experience in the hotel business, her husband having kept an hotel at Kleinburg, "The Red Lion Hotel," Yorkville, "Globe Hotel," city, and the house occupied by her at present. Her husband died some time ago, leaving her with a family of thirteen children. Mrs. Robinson has accommodation in busy times for fifty guests.

Thomas E. Scholes, proprietor of the "Scholes Hotel," situated at 864 Queen Street West, Dundas Street corner. He was horn in Quebec, but came to Toronto with his father and family in 1857, then being only three years of age. He served his apprenticeship at Gurney & Go's at the trade of a moulder, and after leaving there worked for four years with his brother on Albert Street, after which he commenced business at the hotel above mentioned. His success has been marked, and his strict attention to the requirements of his patrons is well known. Recently Mr. Scholes built the large hotel at Parkdale (plans by Mr. James Davis), on the corner of King and Queen Streets, which was only opened n December last, and at the present time an addition of fifty rooms is being made to it. In 1877 Mr. Scholes married Ann Jane Scholes, daughter of the late Richard Scholes.

John Shannessy, proprietor of the "Royal Hotel," Yonge Street, is a native of Ireland, and was born in 1834., in the County of Eimerick. He came with his father and family to Canada in 1840 and settled in Toronto, and for twenty-five years navigated the lakes in different steamers. About eighteen years ago Mr. Shannessy commenced the hotel business at the "Niagara House," Yonge Street, and afterwards removed to the "Royal Saloor" on King Street. In 1876 he opened his present premises, which he owns, and conducts a prosperous business. As President of the Toronto Branch of the Licensed Victuallers' Association, Mr. Shannessy is deservedly popular, his energy and perseverance being of material assistance to that society. In 1862 he married Jane Thompson, by whom he has four children.

Rich\rd Slees, proprietor of "Slees' Hotel," 789 Yonge Street, is a native of Devonshire, England, and came to Canada in 1872. He was engaged in the brewing business about ten years, and in 1882 bought the suburban hotel where he is at present located, and is doing a good local and country trade.

Daniel Small, hotel proprietor, was born in Adjala, Simcoe County, 1843. About ten years ago he came to Toronto and commenced business at an hotel on Queen Street West, which he conducted for about five years. At the end of this period he entered on his present venture—the "Grand Opera House Saloon," 13 Adelaide Street West, where he has excellent accommodation for fifteen guests. Mr. Small married in 1862 Ellen Brazell, whose family were residents of Bond Head.

William Smith, "Osgoode Hotel," corner of Chestnut and Queen Street West. The proprietor of this establishment has been in the hotel business about ten years, his first venture being as caterer at the Union Station, where he remained until 1879, taking possession of the "Osgoode Hotel" in that year. The premises have a frontage of 50 x 150 feet, and are three storeys high.

John Somers, proprietor of the "Sportsman Hotel," No. u and 13 Albert Street, is a native of Ireland and came to Canada in 1842. He first located in Quebec, where he remained until 1850, and afterwards coming to Toronto worked at his trade, that of a cabinet-maker, until 1853. He engaged in the cab business for nine years, and, on giving up that vocation, commenced an hotel at the corner of Elm and Elizabeth Streets known as the "Dove Hotel," continuing there for two years. He next took charge of the "Prince of Wales" hotel, Yonge Street, and before he opened his present premises had charge of the " Durham House."

S. Stroud, hotel-keeper, 54 Bay Street, was born in Kent, England, in July, 1821, and settled in Toronto in 1837. In 1844 he commenced the hotel business at the corner of King and Sherbourne Streets. In the same year he married Sarah Wilson, the daughter of a U. E. Loyalist.

Arthur Gerard Taylor, proprietor of the "Taylor House," corner of Agnes and Elizabeth Streets, is a native of Banffshire, Scotland, and came to Canada in 1873, taking up his residence in this city. He was four years on the Scotch police, and was eight years on the police force of this city. In April, 1882, he succeeded Mr. Patterson in the above popular hotel and restaurant.

Charles Walker, proprietor of the "Crown Hotel," 81 Bay Street, was born in Lanarksh're, Scotland, 1847. When quite young he was employed by a firm of tube-makers in Glasgow, with whom he remained ten years, afterwards working for a Mr. Richmond in the same, business. He emigrated to Canada in the year 1871 and came direct to Toronto, remaining but a short time however, Port Hope being his next destination. There he was engaged with Mr. Smart, postmaster; but ultimately he returned to Toronto and served for eleven years at the " Walker House " under Mr. David Walker, his half-brother. lie commenced hotel-keeping on his own account in 1882 at the premises he at present occupies, where he has good accommodation for twenty-five guests; including also a fine billiard room. Mr. Walker married, in 1872, Elizabeth Moore, from Southampton, England. He intends shortly to enlarge his hotel; his increasing business necessitating this outlay.

David Walker, proprietor of the well known and high-class hotel named after its owner. This building was erected by James Smith in 1873, and since that time has been enlarged on two occasions, viz., 1875 ant^ 1S7S, the alterations at the latter date doubling its accommodating capacity. Since its erection the hotel has been entirely under the proprietorship of Mr. Walker, who in the management has the able assistance of Mr. Wright, whose connection with the travelling community is well-known. There are one hundred and twenty-live rooms at the "Walker House," and excellent accommodation for three hundred guests.

John Henry Westman, hotel-keeper, was born in Toronto, January 10tli, 1856. His father (the late Samuel Westman) was a York pioneer, and in the early days of the city kept hotel on Adelaide Street, Church Street and Market Square. Mr. Westman learned the trade of machinest with Mr. John Fensom, which occupation he followed up to the time of his father's death. His first venture in the hotel business was on Colborne Street, from which (after a trial of eighteen months' duration he removed to his present hotel on Jarvis Street, "The Westman," where he does a good trade. Mr. Westman married in 1879 Anna Williams, daughter of the Inspector of the Esplanade.

E. W. Williams, hotel proprietor, was born in Newcastle, England, in 1833. In 1861 he came to Canada and located in Toronto, where he engaged in the hotel business, having built the house oh Front and Bathurst Streets. Three years later he purchased the "Algeria Hotel," corner of Niagara and Bathurst Streets, which he is carrying on at the present time. His hotel has a frontage of 104 x 105, and is three storeys in height, built of brick.

George Williams, Esplanade Inspector, was born at Petty Harbour, Newfoundland, July 31st, 1831. lie came with his parents to Toronto when only seven years of age. Brought up to no particular business, he engaged in various occupations during the early portion of his life, some time of which he spent on the lakes, owning a trading schooner, which he ran for some years. He entered the hotel business at No. 6 West Market Street, "Williams' Hotel," which he conducted successfully for twenty-one years. Discontinuing the hotel business he still retains his office of Esplanade constable (to which he had some time previously been appointed), and by his urbanity and general kindliness of disposition earns the respect of all who know him. Mr. Williams was twice married, first in 1855 to Eliza Boyd, and secondly to Jane, widow of the late Samuel Westman.

John Wilson, proprietor of the "Wilson House," in York Street, was born in Dublin, Ireland, 1846. He came with his father and family to Canada in 1850 and settled in Toronto. He early learned the trade of a machinist with F. H. Medcalf, after which he followed his business in New York State, U. S. Again he came to Toronto and became foreman for Joab Scales, tobacconist, till 1875, when he embarked in the hotel business at the above mentioned house, where he can accommodate sixty guests. In 1870 Mr. Wilson married Barbara Murray, daughter of Peter Murray, one of the fiirst settlers in the Township of Mono.

John R. Wilson, "Durham House," 624 Yonge Street, was born at Thornhill Village, York County, 1848. Served an apprenticeship to harness making at his birthplace, but did not follow it up. He travelled for the firm of Taylor & Wilson about nine years, and was agent for Thomas Davies & Co. about one year. In the year 1880 he entered upon his present business at the above mentioned address, where he has accommodation in crowded times for twenty-five guests. He married, in 1875, Diana Hardy, who is a native of this county.

Thomas Wilson, hotel proprietor, was born n Yorkshire, England, 1834. His father, George Wilson, emigrated to the United States in 1837 and settled in the Village of Antwerp, Jefferson Count}-, N. Y. At the end of one year's residence he removed from there to Guelph in Canada. Mr. Thomas Wilson, served his apprenticeship in Gait at carriage-making, and on completing his term returned to Guelph, where he worked at his trade for Scott & Watson. Eighteen months afterwards he commenced business on his own account at Wilson's Corners (the place being named after him), where he remained from 1856 to i860. Subsequently he removed to Mount Forest, staying there about eleven years, conducting dui ng that period first the "Anglo-American " and afterwards the "Palmerston" hotels. The enterprise of Mr. Wilson next took him to Durham, the "British" hotel falling to his management for two years, after which he went to Orangeville and secured the control of the Toronto, Grey & Bruce Refreshment Rooms, where he remained until burnt out six years later. In 1879 he came to Toronto and opened the well-known "Wilson's Hotel." 151-153 Bathurst Street, where he accommodates thirty guests. Mr. Wilson married, in 1854, Mary Charming, whose relatives belong to Devonshire, England.

William Woods, proprietor of the "Leslie Hotel," Kingston Road, was born in King's County, Ireland, and came to Canada in May, 1853. For seven years he occupied a position in the warehouse of Robert Reford, establishing himself in the grocery and liquor business at the corner of Caroline and King Streets afterwards. From this locality he removed to the corner of Sackville and King Streets, remaining there fill he bought and took possession of the above hotel in 1876. In connection with tins hotel he has a garden and conservatory, and also owns a lot near the lake for the use of guests desirous of boating or fishing. His premises have a frontage of 81 x 230 feet.

Jethro Worden, hotel proprietor, was born in Kingston Township, Addington County, the birthplace also of his parents. His father, John Worden, was a prominent farmer in that neighbourhood and in the early pays owned a large amount of property. His son, Jethro, adopted the trade of a machinist, and was the first to establish an organ reed manufactory in the Dominion. He selected Toronto for his venture, and in 1878 opened the place on Adelaide Street West, now known as Augustus Newall & Co.'s In 1881 Mr. Worden purchased his present premises and embarked in the hotel business—17 and 19 Adelaide Street West, "Grand Opera Hotel," where twenty guests can be made comfortable. He married in 1867 Sarah Hudson, whose fairly originally came from Devonshire, England.

House-Furnishings.

William Cottrell, manufacturer and dealer in copper, iron and tin-plate hardware. Established in 1866.

Robekt M. Larth, house-furnishings, etc., 433 Yonge Street, was born in the County of Wellington, and served twelve years in the stove manufacturing business, commencing for himself in the early part of 1882 at the above address where he does a general and increasing trade in stoves, tinware, etc.

Thomas J. Spink, house furnishings, stoves, etc., 92 Queen Street West, was born in the Town of Dundas, and came to Toronto in 1878. He has been four years \n his present business, and by close application and earnest attention thereto has made it successful. Mr. Spink employs from five to seven hands.

Ice Dealers

Dominion Ice Delivery, 320 and 322 King Street East, Charles Burns, proprietor. Established in 1866. Mr. Burns has two ice-houses cm King Street East, 50 x 100 feet each; four on Water Street, three of which are 40x60 feet, and one 40x96 feet; one on Carlaw Avenue, 30x135 feet. Stores from thirteen to fourteen thousand tons annually, and runs six double, and several single waggons. Employs about fifteen men in the summer time; in the winter time, eighty men and twenty-five teams. He secures his ice mostly from the lake, and has testimonials from Thomas

Keys, Professor of Chemistry in the Toronto School of Medicine, as to the purity of his ice for 1884. Mr. Burns was Grand President of the Emerald Beneficial Association of Ontario, assembled at St. Catharines m 1884; also President of the Toronto Ice Association, Chairman of the Finance Committee of the Separate School Board of Toronto, of which he has been a member for twenty-four years, and a Justice of the Peace for the County of York. He was born in the County Wicklow, Ireland, in 1840, and settled in Toronto in 1849. He first engaged in the flour and feed business, subsequently in grocery and liquors, both of which he is still engaged in together with his ice business.

John C. Graham, 81 Esplanade East, proprietor of ice delivery, established in 1874. Ice-house, 87 Esplanade (Metropolitan Ice-house), 63x152 feet and 30 feet high, capacity, six thousand tons; one on Cecil Street, 96 x 43 feet, and 20 feet high, capacity one thousand, eight hundred tons; one on Lake Street 20 x 50 feet and 18 feet high, capacity two thousand, two hundred tons. Employs eight delivery waggons; and in summer eleven hands. In winter he elevates by horse-power and runs two gangs of men, eighteen each and six horses. Puts up about tons annuallv. Settled "n Toronto in 1857, and is an iron founder by trade, in which capacity he was engaged for twelve years.

Mrs. Catherine Greenwood, Kingston Road, ice dealer and hotel proprietor, established in 1864 by John Greenwood, who was also a carriage-maker and painter.

Jewellers and Watch makers.

Benjamin Chapman, watchmaker and jeweller, 261 Yonge Street, is a native of Belfast, Ireland, where he learned his trade and carried on business for sixteen years. He came to Canada 11 1864, and ten years later established himself in business at his present store, where he has a first-class connection, his specialty being fine work.

J. E. Ellis & Co., jewellers, etc, 1 King Street East. This business was established in 1836, and does a large retail trade in all kinds of jewellery, watches, clocks, etc. The firm is composed of James E. Ellis and M. T. Cain.

G. Gowland, watchmaker and jeweller, 174 King Street East, established his business in 1874, and does a general retail trade, repairing, etc.

John Marshall Parkinson, manufacturing jeweller, in Richmond Street East, was born in Toronto, being the eldest son of Reuben Parkinson, a native of the United States, who came to Toronto in 1819 and died here in 1879, aged eighty-six years. Mr. Parkinson commenced business in i860 at his present address, where he does all kinds of solid work for the trade.

J. Segswortii be Co., importers of Swiss and American watches and English and American fine gold jewellery, 23 Scott Street. The business was established on Yonge Street n i860, and removed to its present location in 1874. It is exclusively wholesale, two travelling agents being employed. Mr. Segsworth was born in Toronto in 1837. His father, John Segsworth, was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1806, and settled in Toronto in 1831 ; he died in 1872.

Charles Ward, 223 Queen Street East, is a manufacturing jeweller and elcctro-platcr, conducting business at this address. He first commenced business on Queen Street West in 1856, removing in 1876 to his present premises.. Mr. Ward is a native of New York City, and came to Toronto in 1841.

George Ward, manufacturing jeweller, 27 Colborne Street, is a native of New York State, and first commenced business in this city on Toronto Street m 1853. He remained here five years, subsequently removing to King Street, and in 1876 occupied his present place of business, 27 Colborne Street, Toronto, Ontario. He treats with the trade wholesale, but does a retail trade as well.

Henry T. Windt, gold chain manufacturer, 38 Scott Street, is a native of New York City, and in 1881 commenced business in Toronto in the above line.

Law Stationers.

David II. Doust, manager for the Toronto Law Form Company, 1uhographers, printers and law stationers, 326 Adelaide Street East, is a native of London, England, having there learned his business. He came to Canada in 1868 and soon afterwards commenced business at the Masonic Hall, Toronto Street. He was with Mr. Carswell for about five years, and ip 1877 took the law stationery part of the business, which he continued for a time. He established himself i n business at his present location in 1883.

J. M. Dransfielo, law book and law form stationer, 28 Front Street East, was born in Manchester, England, and came to Canada in 1862, but two years later returned to England, and on coming back to Canada in 1866 travelled for a Montreal firm. On his settlement in Toronto he opened a wholesale fancy goods store on Yonge Street. He moved to Kingston and took charge of the Bonded Vinegar Works at that place, staying but a short time however, and returned to Toronto and became connected with Mr. Carswell in the law book and law form stationery business. In 1877 Mr. Dransfield took possession of the business of Jarnes G. Owen, in which line he has since continued.

Livery Stables.

Allan Bolton, proprietor of the cab, coupe' and livery stable at 331 Yonge Street, is a native of London, England, and came to this city in May, 1884. Established himself at once in this business. Keeps twelve horses, runs five cabs and a variety of new and tasty turn-outs, and trusts by attention to his customers to mert a fair share of the trade.

Frank Campbell, veterinary surgeon and proprietor of sales and boarding stables, 30, 32 and 34 Richmond Street West. This gentleman graduated in 1874 at the Ontario Vetinary College, and practised his profession at Rochester and Canandaigua, N.Y., up to 1878. His father, Duncan Campbell, President of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Ontario, dying that year, Mr. Frank Campbell came to Toronto and located at the address above, and at present is in the possession of a large city practice.

Frederick Doane, proprietor of Livery, cab and boarding stables, 619 to 623 Yonge Street, is a native of this city, being the son of the late Henry Doane, who came from England to this country in 1851, and followed the occupation of blacksmith for several years an this city. In 1866 he started the livery stable business, subsequently building the premises where the trade is now carried on. At his death, which occurred in 1868, Frederick assumed control of the business, which he still successfully conducts. He owns thirty horses and runs six cabs.

Grand & Walsh, proprietors of the extensive sale stables, 47, 49, 51 and 53 Adelaide Street West. This justly celebrated firm has established a world-wide reputation, and is fast becoming one of the prominent institutions of this country—being the largest business of .ts kind on this continent. They sold over four thousand horses by auction last year, the sales taking place every Tuesday and Friday. They buy and sell large numbers of horses, aside from doing an extensive commission business ; they also do a large business in selling blooded horses on commission, and this branch, though lately established, is becoming one of the important features of their trade. They also run in connection with their business twenty-five horses in livery and twenty-five one-horse cabs, running night and day. They have telephone communication with all parts of the city. The business was established by the late Joseph Grand in 1855, who was an Englishman by birth, and came to Canada about the above date, doing a business on a small scale at the start, his attention being devoted to the sales business. His death occurred in 1877, Grand taking the business soon after; the firm of Walsh 8c Grand was formed in 1879. Their trade extends throughout the Dominion, United States and England. They have supplied, and continue to supply, the garrison at Halifax. Capacity of their stable is for one hundred and fifty horses. Their buildings have a frontage of 90 x 250 feet. Mr. Grand is the auctioneer and manages the office department ; Mr. Walsh doing the buying outside. The sale business is carried on after the plan of the famous "Tattersall " stables in England ; horses are sold by guaranteed catalogue.

C. G. Eongbottom, proprietor of livery and boarding stables, 16 Adelaide Street West, has been a resident of this city since he was three years of age. In the year 1884 bought out the livery business where he is at present located, and he is now prepared to give satisfaction to the genera.' public.

James McCarron, Jr., proprietor of livery, cab, sales and boarding stables, 19 to 21 Queen Street East, is the son of the late James McCarron, a native of Ireland, who took up his residence in this city in 1852, and engaged in various occupations, finally entering the hotel business which is yet in the hands of the family. His son James was born in Toronto, and started his present business in 1880. He owns nine horses and two cabs, and is doing a largely increasing business.

John Mitchell, proprietor of livery, sales and boarding stables, 16 and 18 Duke Street, is a native of Clare County, Ireland, and came to Canada with his parents when very young. His father died of cholera soon after his arrival here in 1832. Mr. Mitchell, during his long residence in the city, has in turns adopted other branches of business besides the one he is at present engaged in, having been in the grocery and also hotel line. He commenced as livery stable proprietor in 1855, <l°ne a continuous business for nineteen years. He owns from twenty to thirty horses, and does a large trade.

J. L. Scott & Co., proprietor of boarding, livery and sales stables, 8 and ro Duke Street. Business established by the above firm in 1880, where they keep about twenty horses for the use of their customers, and are prepared to give the best accommodation in their line.

Isaac Stutton, proprietor of hack and coupe business, 550 Yonge Street, was born in Perth, and came to this city in 1864. He was connected with the hosiery business for several years, and in 1880 retired from the same and started his present business. He runs a hack, coupe', and rockaway, owns the building, and is about to increase his stock.

George C. Tumlin, proprietor of sales and commission stables, 56 George Street, is a native of the State of Maryland, and came to Canada in 1865, settling at once in this city, and starting the business he still successfully carries on. In 1868 he established himself at his present location, where he does an extensive horse trade, having large contracts with Michigan lumber firms, and also with the Buffalo Street Car Company.

George Verrale, cab, coupe', and boarding stable proprietor, n to 19 Mercer Street, was born in Sussex, England, and came to Canada in 1846, settling at once in this city. Before commencing m his present business he was in the employ of the Grand Trunk Railway Company, first m connection with the survey party, afterwards as an official. His livery business is one of the oldest in the city, and as an instance of what may be accomplished by perseverance and energy we may mention that he started business with a single one-horse cab, while at the present time he owns thirty-two horses and fifteen cabs and coupes. Mr. Verrall is Alderman for St. George's Ward.

Locksmiths.

Thomas Hicks, locksmith and bell-hanger, 11 Richmond Street East was born m England, and came to Canada in 1867. He had before this worked at his trade of locksmith in New York for two years, and on his arrival in Toronto he located on Yonge Street, removing four years later to his present address. Mr. Hicks has the sole agency for the Province of Ontario of Zindar's patent pneumatic bell, which has a large and increasing sale. He has done most of the bell-hanging in Toronto for this patent which has given great satisfaction. During the last three years he has taken the prize for locks at the Exhibition.

John & E. H. Roberts, proprietors of the "Beaver Lock Works,'4 established 1868, manufacture keys and locks to order. Locksmiths to Toronto Post-office, Dominion Postal Service, Central Prison, Mercer Reformatory, Toronto Jail and Public Schools. Also manufacture white metal, house door numbers and street corner tablets, for which they are contractors to the City of Toronto. Employ six men. At the Industrial Exhibitions of 1883-4 they were awarded four first prizes, two diplomas and two bronze medals.

Marble Works.

J. G. Gibson, proprietor of steam marble works, 417 to 425 Parliament Street. Established in 1868. He imports from Italy and the United States, and supplies to smaller dealers in the rough. He makes a specialty of marble mantels. This s the only steam works in the city, and gives employment to twelve men. Mr. Gibson received the first prizes at the Toronto Exhibitions of 1876,. 1880 and 1882 for mantels, those being the only years he exhibited. He deals largely in slate also.

Frederick B. Gullett, granite and marble works, 100 and 102 Church Street, was born in Devonshire, England, in 1842, and came to America in 1857. He remained in New York until 1868, and removed in that year to Toronto, and commenced business at the above location. He executes monuments, sculpture and carved work of all descriptions in marble, granite and stone. He first introduced the celebrated Bay of Fundy red granite, for monumental and building purposes, and is also wholesale dealer in all kinds of granite and foreign marble. He employs from fifteen to twenty men, and distributes his work over Ontario, and various parts of the United States. The carved work of the New Post office, Queen City Insurance Company's office, McMaster's warehouse, and numerous public buildings of the city was executed by Mr. Gullett.

J. E. Pearen, 535 Yonge Street, importer of marble and granite. Imports marble largely from Italy, having the chief share of this business in the city. He makes a specialty of furniture tops, mantels and building class works. Established in 1875, and employs six hands. Received first prize at Toronto Exhibition for mantel works in 1881. Sells to the trade wholesale marble, in the raw.

Millers.

Alexander Barclay, oat and corn meal mill, 192 King Street East, established his business m 1879- In connection with this he has a flour and feed mill, which was established in 1873.

Milk Dealers.

Fred. Sole, 481 £ Yonge Street, Oakville Milk Depot. Established in 1877, and deals exclusively in country milk. Runs three waggons, and supplies two hundred gallons of milk to his customers daily.

Miscellaneous.

William Armstrong, general smith, 53 Sherbourne Street, is a native of Roxburghshire, Scotland, being the eldest son of George Armstrong, of Newcastleton, also a general smith, who died at Whitby, Ontario, in 1878. Mr. Willlam Armstrong came to Canada in 1862, and established business at Dariington, Ontario, and in 1872 removed to his present place of business.

George F. 13ostwick, 50 Church Street, agent for Goldie & McCulloch, safe manufacturers, Gait, commenced business in Toronto in 1874 as a coal merchant, and m 1884 took charge of his present business. lie is a native of Toronto, and only son of Mr. George Bostwick, of this city.

N. P. Chaney 6c Co., feather and mattress renovators, 230 King Street East, established their business in 1880. In 1882 they received a diploma for superior mattresses, feathers and pillows.

A. H. Dixon & Son, 305 King Street West, Catarrh specialists. The head of the firm is a native of Jedburgh, Scotland, and came to Canada in 1857. Previous to establishing his present business he had for a short period followed the profession of accountant, afterwards doing a large trade >n wholesale picture dealing.

W. H. Ferguson, builder and contractor, in Bay Street.

James W. Ingham, modeller and designer, 28 Victoria Street, was born in London, England, and came to Canada in 1871. He first located on Wood Street in this city, and engaged in his profession. The ornamental work of the Metropolitan Church, together with several other buildings in Toronto, are the product of his skill. In 1879 Mr. Ingham married Miss Jane Beamish, of this city, by whom he has one daughter.

Addison Norman, proprietor of Norman's electro-curative appliances and curative baths, 4 Queen Street East, Toronto, Ontauo. Mr. Norman is a native of Yorkshire, England. He emigrated to Canada in 1863, and for the past twenty years he has been actively engaged in the application of electricity as a curative to the human system. He has also invented several appliances, among which are the Norman Truss and the Acme Electric: Belt, brought out n 1879, the only appliance in use that combines galvanism with magnetism consecutively. This appeance transmits two kinds of currents to the body—galvanic and magnetic. The first strengthens, rebuilds and heals the weak and suffering organs; the other charges the iron particles of the blood and causes it to resume its proper circulation ; and both have a soothing, strengthening effect upon the nerves. He has also invented a variety of galvanic belts, which have been used with great success in thousands of cases. His magneto-electric belts are manufactured of silk, satin and flannel, the magnets being hermetically sealed and scientifically arranged with appliances. The electrical condition of the blood is now a well-established fact ; also in proportion to its electrical condition is the circulation vigorous, and all the functions of life efficiently performed. He has also in connection with his business established electric, sulphur, vapour, steam, herbal, mercurial, hot, cold and shower baths, which are well adapted to the various diseases that the human family are heir to. The utility of these baths has become so general that there is scarcely a large city without one or more. The effect is so marked and permanent that no person can fail to appreciate their value.

Thomson & Sons, dealers in wall paper, etc, 364 Yonge Street. The firm is composed of James Thomson, sen'r, James B., and John G. Thomson.

Music Dealers.

Thomas Claxton, importer and dealer hi sheet and book music, band instruments, violins, guitars, etc., and all kinds of musical merchandise, located at 197 Yonge Street. Business established in 1869, first located at 24 Adelaide Street East, where he remained a short time; then removed to his present location. His show-rooms have a frontage of 25 x 125 feet and occupy three flats. Mr. Claxton is one of the oldest music dealers in the city; born in England; came to Canada in 1850.

Nurserymen.

Henry Slight, city nurseries, 407 Yonge Street, is a native of L incolnshire, England, and came to Canada in 1862, soon after settling in this city. He established himself in his present line of business m 1876. He has conservatories and sales yard at the above location, where he keeps on hand a full assortment of fruit and ornamental trees, plants and shrubs, including a choice variety of roses, vines, cut flowers and decorative plants.

Painters, etc.

Alexander & Son, painters and sign painters. This firm does a good business, employing from ten to twenty hands during the year. It is composed of Henry S. Alexander, who was born in County Armagh, Ireland, and came to Toronto in 1857, and his son, John Alexander.

E. H. Boddy, painter, 245 Queen Street East, is the son of James S. Boddy, a native of County Leitrim, Ireland, who came to Canada in 1830, and followed his trade of carpenter and builder for many years. He died in 1872. His son learned the trade of painter with the late Mr. Alexander Hamilton, and worked for nineteen years after as journeyman. He then established himself in business, which up to the present time he has worked successfully.

George II. Clayton', house painter and decorator, 57 Yorkville Avenue, is a native of Lancashire, England, and came to Canada in 1864 ; settled in this city and commenced his present business, which he has since successfully carried on.

Charles D. S. Corin, sign painter, was born in Devonshire, England, in 1834. 1S the eldest in a family of ten children, and came to Canada with his parents when only ten years of age. He received his early education in this city, and on leaving school decided to follow the same trade as his father—that of a painter; accordingly he was put under the care of Mr. Charles March, from whom he learned his business. In 1861 he married Misi Rebecca Allen, of Scarboro' Township. Mr. Corin belongs to the Orange body, and is a Conservative in politics; he is a member of the English Church.

M. O'Connor, painter and decorator, 95 Church Street, was born in Ireland m 1830, and at the age of ten years came to Canada with his parents. He learned his trade with Hart & March, of this city, and at the expiration of his apprenticeship commenced business for himself, which he has since carried on. During his business career he has done the. painting and decorating of some of the largest buildings in the city, among which may be mentioned the new Post-Office, Central Prison, Inland Revenue Office, Grand Opera House, All Saints' Church and the New Arcade. He also does a large business in the importation of plate glass, and we may safely say that his trade in this line fully equals that of any one else in the city. Mr. O'Connor is a J.P. for the County of York, and besides fulfilling this public duty with conscientious care, likewise takes a deep interest in the temperance cause. In his business he employes from forty to sixty men.

T. E. Phillips, house decorator, 115 Church Street.

Jeremiah Sears, painter and decorator, 139 Church Street and 22, 24 and 26 Dalhousie Street, was born in Kent, England, in 1823, and came to Canada in 1842. He first located in Quebec, where he worked at his trade, and in 1850 removed to Toronto, commencing the business which he has since successfully conducted. Mr. Sears has done some of the finest work in the city, and is the only one who produces the enamelled white letter signs. He employs from eight to ten hands. He was an officer of the first Painters' Union, established in 1854, anil later on in conjunction with Mr. Fairclough organized a second Union.

R. J. Stanley, painter and decorator, 410 Yonge Street, was born in Toronto in 1844, and is the son of Robert Stanley, of Irish birth, who emigrated to Canada in 1832, and followed his trade of mason in this city for a number of years; he is still living on Seaton Street, being seventy-nine years of age. R. J, Stanley learned his trade with his brother William (late Alderman for St. John's Ward), with whom he worked as journeyman until they formed the partnership which continued till the death of Alderman Stanley in 1877. Since that date Mr. Stanley has conducted the business alone, arid the possession of a thorough practical knowledge of his trade enables him to give every satisfaction in all contracts he undertakes.

Andrew Widdowson, painter and decorator, 89 Wilton Avenue, is a native of Nottinghamshire, England, and came to Canada in 1842. He first located at Kingston, where he worked at his trade, afterwards removing to Toronto. In 1854. he established himself in the grocery business on the corner of Yonge and Shuter Streets, and continued the same for five years, subsequently returning to his original business, which he has since continued to follow.

Paints, Oils and Varnish.

William Elliott, dealer in plate glass, etc., commenced business in Toronto m 1859 as a painter and glazier. In 1878 he began importing British plate glass, and about the same t me began the business of staining and enamelling on glass, sand cutting and embossing, figure painting on glass for church and other purposes, which he sends to all parts of the Dominion. Fresco painting, and all k nds of decorative work, etc., are also executed at this establishment, which had heretofore been done by foreign labour. The name of the firm is now Elliott & Son, and they employ on an average from seventy to eighty men, and transact business to the amount of about §60,000 annually. Office address : 94 Bay Street.

The. Harris Company (Limited), 44 King Street East, importers and dealers in paints, oils, varnishes, window glass, artists' materials, etc., etc. In 1852 the business was established by Dr. F. H. Simpson, who, a year or two later, admitted W. H. Dunspaugh as partner. On account of ill-health Dr. F. H. Simpson sold his interest to his brother, Dr. E. Simpson. A few years later Dr. E. Simpson sold his interest to James Watson, the style of the firm being Dunspaugh & Watson. Some years after J. L. Margach bought Dunspaugh & Watson out, and he in turn sold to E. Harris. In 1875 E. Harris formed a co-partnership with Henry Burden and E. B. Ta3'lor. In 1878 E. B. Ta}'lor died, and in 1881 E. Harris died, leaving Henry Burden, who formed the present company, of which he is President.

Andrew Muirhead, importer of paints, colours, varnishes, glues, chamois skins, brushes, sponges, bronze powders, etc., 96 Bay Street.

Patent Medicines.

G. G. Green, sole manufacturer of "Boschee's German Syrup," Green's August Flower and Ague Conqueror, at Woodbury, New Jersey. Branch House, 37 Front Street East, Toronto. Established in 1878. M. M. Pitcraft, manager. Sold by wholesale, and by travelling agents.

Northrop & Lyman Co. (Limited), general agents and dealers in patent medicines, 21 Front Street West. The business was established in 1854, and was located in Newcastle, Ontario, for twenty years, being then removed to Toronto, where they at first occupied premises on Scott Street, and in 1879 removed to their present building. The warehouse has a frontage of 30 x 160 feet, with four flats. The firm employ four travellers and about thirty employe's in the house, and do a very extensive business. Their trade extends from British Columbia to Halifax.

Tiif. Charles A. Vogeler Company, of Baltimore, Md., U. S. A., sole proprietors of "St. Jacob's Oil," the "Hamburg" medicines, and other standard specialties. Canadian branch established in Toronto in 1881, of which E. H. Woolley is the manager.

Photographers.

Thomas Adams, 145 and 147 Yonge Street, photographer. Established on King Street East in 1880, and removed to his present location is 1883. Makes a specialty of life-sized portraits. He has been an artist for fourteen years, and worked with Stanton and Vicars in Toronto, and with the Centennial Photograph Company, Philadelphia.

S. J. Dixon, photographer, corner of King and Yonge Streets. Established in 1872, and at present employs ten hands. He exhibited at the Photographers' Convention at Indianapolis in 1882, and at Milwaukee «n 1883, and has received favourable notices in all the journals of art. Received "First Prize" in Toronto in 1883. Mr. Dixon was the first to successfully produce pictures by the Electric Light. He is a member of the Photographers' Association of America.

Eldridge Stanton, photographer, 134 Yonge Street. This business was established by Stanton and Vicars, in 1877, on King Street East, and was moved to its present location in 1881. Mr. Stanton commenced as a daguerrotypist as early as 1855, and for some years was in business in the United States, being a member of the firm of Stanton & Butler, of Baltimore. Amongst the work executed by them maybe mentioned portraits of Generals Grant, Hancock, and Sherman, for which they received $1,000 each. The present firm is doing a good business, and employ five hands. Mr. Stanton is a lineal descendant of Thomas Stanton, of England, who settled and founded " Stonington," Conn., ;n 1620. The grandfather of Eldridge settled m what is now Cobourg, Ont., m 1794, and took up a large tract of land. His father, Oliver Stanton, was born at Cobourg in 1801, and is still living.

Picture Frames, etc.

Cook & Bunker, manufacturers of mirror and picture frames, 36 King Street West, established their business if 1879, and do a good local trade. They have also commenced the manufacture of rubber and metal stamps of all descriptions for banks, railroads, business offices, etc. They are doing well this new line, and are getting .n all the latest machinery for the purpose of giving the public the very best kind of stamps that it is possible to manufacture. Operations in this branch of the business were begun on the 1st of October last, and the department is now in full working order.

W. J. Huston, picture frame maker, 18 Adelaide Street West, was born in Toronto :.n 1851. In 1867 he went to the United States, where he remained until 1880, when he returned to Toronto. He established his business about two years ago.

Plasterers.

Edwin Butt, plasterer, was born in Gloucester, England, m 1812, and emigrated to Canada m 1832, taking up his abode *n Toronto, where he has since remained following h.*s trade. in 1846 he married Miss Sarah Davitt, of County Fermanagh, Ireland, by whom he had three children, two of whom are living.

Plumbers.

Bennett & Wright, plumbers and gas-fitters, 72 Queen Street East; established in 1875. This firm do all classes of work : a connection with their trade, and employ from fifty to sixty men, and make a specialty of steam and hot-water heating. Mr. Bennett died n 1878, and since then the business has been conducted by his surviving partner, Joseph Wright. He has taken first prize for plumbers' and eng: leers' brass work, silver medal for best sanitary arrangement of water-closets, and bronze medal for hot-water heating.

W. J. Burroughs, plumber and gas-fitter, 315 Queen Street West, established in 1878, employs from twenty-five to forty-five hands; works about equally in plumbing and steam-heating; makes a specialty of fine sanitary plumbing.

James Crapper, plumber and brass founder, 32 Duke Street, was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1808. He learned his business in London, England, and became a sub-contractor with one of the largest gas and water-works contractors of the time, by whom he was sent to Montreal to construct gas and water-works. In 1881 he was sent to Toronto with a cargo of pipe and machinery, being under a three years' contract with Turner, Mason 8c Co., and having the entire control of the machinery until disposed of to a new firm. He then commenced his present business on what is now called Jar\is Street, and continued it there until he was burned out by the great fire of 1848, after which he located at his present stand.

Samuel Hobbs, 184 Queen Street (Parkdale), plumber, tinner, etc. Established on Agnes Street in 1877, and moved to present location hi 1878. In connection with plumbing he manufactures tin and copper-ware, of which he keeps a general stock, as also of house-furnishings and hardware. He employs from three to five men.

R. H. Lear, sanitary plumber and noted Gas-fixture Emporium, 15 and 17 Richmond Street West, first commenced business in Toronto on Victoria Street in the year 1874, and 'n 1875 moved to Bay Street, and in 1877 moved to what soon took the lead as the noted Gas-fixture Emporium,. 171 Yonge Street. Early in 1884 he bought the old Catholic Apostolic Church, Richmond Street, on which he has built his present factor}' 50 x 100 feet, which with a splendid plate glass front makes one of the most attractive stores in his line of business in the Dominion.

W. B. Malcolm, plumber, 89 Church Street.

Quigley and Sim, plumbers, 124 Bay Street. Firm composed of W. G. Quigley and John Sini.

J. & N. Richards, 248 Queen Street East, plumbers, tinners, and house-furnishers, established in 1874, employ from seven to ten men, and do a general business in their line ; manufacture all kinds of tin- ware, such as eave-troughing, cornice-work, etc.

John Ritchie, Jun'r, plumber, Toronto, was born in Aberdeen, Scot-and, October 9th, 1849. His father, ex-Alderman John Ritchie, is still living in Toronto. His mother, Margaret Hanan, died when he was three years old. He first learned the plumbing trade, and afterwards engaged n

the piano and organ business for some time. He is now largely interested in real estate. On January 8th, 1875, he married Lillie Dunn, whose parents, Jonathan and Jane (Wallis) Dunn, are both dead ; she was born in Toronto, September 5th, 1854. his marriage he has had live children, John Harrow, Lillie Dunn, Irene Louise, Herbert Percy, and Edith Laura. Mr. Ritchie is a Presbyterian, and a Reformer.

Stewart Wills, plumber, steam and gas-fitter, 173 King Street West, was born in Fifeshire, Scotland, in 1822, emigrated to Montreal m 1841, and came to Toronto in 1850.

Restaurants.

Jewell & Clow, proprietors of restaurant, 56, 58 and Go Colborne Street; established in 1874. This is the largest establishment of its kind in the city, where five hundred meals are served daily. The building is five storeys high, and has a frontage of 80 x 100 feet, and the staff of hands in connection with the business numbers nineteen. Mr. Jewell was born in England, and came to Canada :n 1854, and has been engaged in the restaurant business for twenty years. Mr. Clow was also born in England, and came here in 1867, since which time he has been engaged m the hotel and restaurant trade.

William Young Martin, hotel and restaurant, was born at Wimbledon, England, in 1843. His early life was spent in the English metropolis, his father at that time being proprietor of " The Feathers " Hotel, Drury Lane. When a young man the subject of this sketch entered the service of the East Indian Company, afterwards the " Black Ball Line," and continued for seven years on board the "Result," commanded by Captain Cowes, and afterwards by Captain Dickinson. Mr. Marlm arrived m Toronto >u the year 1867, and after trying his hand at a variety of occupations finally settled down to the hotel business. He first commenced at the "Half Way" House on Front Street, where he remained four years. He then erected his present establishinent, 62 Kmg Street West, which is considered one of the most complete of its kmd in the city, his restaurant accommodating daily between two and three hundred guests.

The St. Charles Restaurant, 68 and 70 Yonge Street, Abner Brown, proprietor. This business was started by George Brown in 1871. Adam Brown succeeded his brother in 1873. employs from twelve to twenty hands.

M. A. Thomas, proprietor of Thomas's Restaurant, 3o King Street West, commenced business in his present location in 1861. In 1879 he built his present commodious establishment, 20 x 174 feet, and three storeys high. It contains a fine bar-room, restaurant, dining-room, and forty bedrooms. He employs from twenty-five to thirty hands, and accommodates a large number of guests.

Roofing and Slating.

George Duthie, slate roofer, is a native of Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and came to Canada, settling in Toronto about 1855, and for six years engaged m slate roofing. In i85i he removed to the County of Grey, where he stayed eight years and engaged in farming. He then returned to Toronto and recommenced the business of slate roofing. Mr. Duthie is of opinion that since he began the business has increased seventy-five per cent. lie employs on an average about nine hands. Uses Canadian and American slate. His residence, office, yard, etc., are located at 261 Adelaide Street West, under the name and firm of G. Duthie & Sons.

Duncan Forbes, roofer, settled in this city in 1842, and commenced business as builder and contractor, which he continued for several years, having during that time assisted in and constructed many of Toronto's noblest architectural triumphs. He was the first to establish the felt and gravel roofing business here, which was in 1856; and up to the tune of his death, which occurred December nth, 1881, he followed that branch of trade. His son William, who had formerly been in partnership with him, succeeded to the business, which he carries on at 163 Queen Street West. Amongst the buildings which bear witness to the superiority of this kind of roofing, we may mention Osgoode Hall, Rank of Toronto, Bank of British North America, Rossin House, New Exhibition Building, and the New Arcade. Some of these roofs have been up eighteen years and will still bear favourable inspection.

R. G. Rennie, slate roofer, was born -n Aberdeenshire, Scotland, in 1822. He came to Canada in 1854, and located first in Montreal, where he engaged in roofing, remaining there two years, and afterwards coming to Toronto, where he has continued to follow the same business, which is one of the oldest in the city.

Howard Williams, was born in Lorain County, Ohio, January 21st, 1841. He spent four and a-half years m the United States regular service during the Rebellion, and ranked as lieutenant. In 1878 he settled in Brantford, Ontario, and engaged in the slate and gravel-roofing business, He moved to Toronto in 1881 and carries on the business of gravel-roofing, slating, and manufacturing and dealing in roofing materials at 4 Adelaide Street East.

L. A. Wismer, slate roofer, 167 Straohan Avenue, was born m Mark-ham, Ontario. July 5th, 1844. He was married in 1878. His father, Jacob Wismer, who was born in Bucks County, Penn., in 1798, settled in Mark-ham in 1806, where he still resides on the seventh concession.

Rubber Goods.

Canadian Rubber Co., of Montreal, was established there in 1854, and does an extensive business, employing eight hundred men. The Toronto branch at 21 Yonge Street, and 1 Front Street East, under the management of Robert Houghan, was established in 1879. Employment is given to two travelling salesmen and seven clerks.

The Gutta Percha and Rubber Manufacturing Co., whose Toronto warehouse and office is at 10 and 12 King Street East, under the management of T. Mcllroy, jun'r, does perhaps the largest business of the kind in the world. They have manufactories in Brooklyn, N.Y., and San Francisco, and warehouses 114 New York, Portland, Oregon, and other places. The Toronto branch was established in 1878, and has been so prosperously conducted that the company is erecting a large manufactory at Parkdale, which will give employment to about one hundred men.

Tailors.

James, Alison, merchant tailor, 264 Yonge Street; established business in 1876, and employs twenty-five hands.

James Austen, 304 Queen Street East, merchant tailor and dealer in gents' furnishings, established his business in 1877, is a native of London, England, and came to Canada in 1870. His store has a frontage of 20 x 50 feet, and has increased from a small beginning to a large and prosperous concern.

John Bland, importer and merchant tailor, 108 Yonge Street, established himself in 186b at 176 Yonge Street, removing to his present store in 1879. He has a frontage of 18 x 60 feet, with three storeys in height. He employs a staff of twenty-one hands. Mr. Bland is a native of Castle Douglas, Scotland, and came to Canada in 1855, since which year he has been a resident of Toronto.

John Brimer, merchant tailor and importer, 210 Yonge Street, established his business in 1868 at 171 Yonge Street. Before taking possession of his present premises in 1880, he had carried on business at No. 202 on the same street for some little time. His show-rooms have a frontage of 26. x 150 feet, and are three storeys high. He supports the greater portion of his stock direct. Mr. Brimer was born m Scotland, and came to Canada in 1867.

J. W. Cheeseworth, merchant tailor, 106 King Street West, first located on Yonge Street in 1874, and removed to his present premises in 1884, His show-rooms have a frontage of 18 x 65 feet. He employs from fifteen to twenty hands, and imports his stock direct. Mr. Cheeseworth is a native of England, and was for some time connected with a paper in London called the Tailor s Cutter.

P. M. Clark, merchant tailor, 95 King Street West. This business, which was started <n 1853 by Gibb & Co., came into the hands of Mr. Clark in 1858. He gives employment to about thirty men.

Philip Dwyer, merchant tailor, 98 Seaton Street, is an American by birth, and only son of Michael Dwyer, a native of Tipperary, Ireland. He commenced business in Toronto in 1874, with the present house, the "Flags of all Nations."

William Gibson, merchant tailor, 205 Yonge Street, is a native of Belfast, Ireland, and came to Toronto in 1876. He established his present business in 1882, and employs on an average about thirty hands, who are engaged in all kinds of tailoring.

George Harcourt & Son, importers and merchant tastors, 43 King Street East. This business was established in 1842, and for twenty-live years was conducted in premises situated at the corner of King Street and Leader Lane. This is now the oldest tailoring establishment in the city. The present store has a frontage of 25 x 100 feet. Their specialties are, barrister's gowns, college caps, surplices, stoles, cassocks, etc., in which line they have a large connection. George Harcourt and his son, Robert B. Harcourt, constitute the firm. Mr. Harcourt, sen r, is a native of England, and came to Canada in 1842,

Philip Jamieson, manufacturing tailor, etc., 180, 180J Yonge Street. This business was established in 1873 under the name of Spain & Jamieson, and was located at 38 Queen Street West. In 1875 Mr. Spain retired from the firm, since which time Mr. Jamieson has carried on the business alone. In 1877 he removed to his present premises at the above address, which have, a frontage of 60 x 100 feet, on Yonge and Queen Streets respectively, where are employed a staff of one hundred and fifty hands. This is one of the largest houses in Canada retailing their own manufactures. Mr. Jamieson is a native of Scotland, and came to Canada in March, 1873, since which he has been a resident of this city.

J. Maloney & Son, importers and merchant tailors, 89 Bay Street. The firm is composed of J. M. and Richard Maloney, who established the business in 1867. Their show-rooms have a frontage of 20 x 80 feet, and are three storeys high, the internal arrangements being complete with all modern improvements. They employ about thirty-live hands, and work up only the finest fabrics.

Mr McEachren, merchant tailor, 191 Yonge Street, established his business in 1852, at 201 Yonge Street, removing afterwards to his present location. In 1874 Mr. McEachren rebuilt the premises he last occupied, and now has one of the finest blocks on the street, the "Albert Hall" being included. His store has a frontage of 37 x 208 feet. He employs about fifteen hands and imports his goods direct. He' makes a specialty of military tailoring. Mr McEachren was born in Scotland and came to Canada in 1842.

John F. McRae, merchant tailor, 200 Yonge Street, commenced business in 1880. His show-rooms have a frontage of 18 x 103 feet, and are four storeys high. He employ s a staff of thirty hands. Mr. McRae is a native of Inverness, Scotland, and came to Canada in 1868.

William Nolan, tailor and manufacturer of ordered clothing, 36 Colborne Street. This business was established by himself in 1880, and was situated until 1882 at 33 Scott Street, from which place it was removed to its present address. He employs a staff of hands. Mr. Nolan was born in Montreal, and came to Toronto in 1875.

Price Bros, merchant tailors, 282 Queen Street West. This business was established by the present firm in 1882, at 197 Queen Street West, and is composed of S. & A. Price, who removed to their present store in 1884. The building is three storeys n height, and has a frontage of 14 x 125 feet. Heir trade is confined principally to the city, and gives employment to twenty people. The brothers are Canadians by birth.

R. Score & Son, importing tailors, and dealers in gents' furnishings, 77 King Street West. This firm was first known as R. Score, in 1842— his son, R. J. Score, entering the firm later on, since which it has gone under its present title. The store has a frontage of 35 x 200 feet; the business employing a staff of about sixty hands. Mr. R. Score, sen'r, is of English birth, and came to Canada in 1832. Mr. R. J. Score was born in Toronto.

Robert Wilson, tailor, 39 Adelaide Street West, was born in Roxburg-shire, Scotland, Ln 1821, and settled in Toronto 1854.

Tinsmiths.

James Murray, tinsmith, 224 and 313 Yonge Street, is a native of Glasgow, Scotland, and on his settlement in Toronto he engaged in this business at the above addresses, both of which are now occupied b- his sons. Mr. Murray owns the above property, and in addition is the possessor of two fine residences.

Undertakers.

W. H. Ingram, undertaker and dealer in funeral supplies, 213 Queen Street East. Business established in 1881. The show room has a frontage of 25x120 feet deep. Mr. Ingram is a native of Portsmouth, England, where he formerly conducted a similar business, and on his arrival m Canada in 1868 he at once settled in Toronto, and owns now a nice little business.

M. McCabe, undertaker ami dealer ia funeral goods, 333 Queen Street West. Business established in 1862 under the name of Thornhill & McCabe. Mr. McCabe has been on Queen Street for the last twenty-two years, and has been city undertaker for fourteen years, being one of the oldest in the city. His show-rooms have a frontage of 30x100 feet. He is a Canadian by birth.

F. Rosar, undertaker and dealer in fine funeral goods, 240 King Street East. Business established in 1861. Mr. Rosar is the oldest undertaker in Toronto, and has occupied his present premises for fifteen years. The show-room has a frontage of 22 x 118 feet, and is four storeys in height. Mr. Rosar is a native of Germany, and has resided in Toronto since his arrival in Canada in 1862.

II. Stone, sen'r, undertaker and importer of funeral goods, 239 Yonge Street. This business was established in 1869 at 347 Yonge Street, and removed to its present locality in 1880. The show-rooms have a frontage of 25x100 feet, and contain a fine stock of funeral regalia and goods. Mr. Stone is a native of Ireland, and came to Canada with his parents In 1831. He has been a resident of tin's city since 1840.

J. Young, undertaker and importer of line funeral goods, 347 Yonge .Street. Business established in 186S. Mr. Young commenced business in this city as a perfect stranger, and since his advent has built up an exceedingly line trade. He had been at two different local ties on Yonge Street before removing to his present premises in 1881. The show-rooms, which are 25 x 130 feet, are. elegant, and contain a large and varied stock of funeral goods. Mr. Young was born in Montreal, where he served eighteen years with George Armstrong, the leading undertaker of that city.

Upholsterers.

George Cole, upholsterer, 348 Queen Street East. Established in 1872 at 262 King Street East, and removed to his present quarters in 1878. Mr. Cole does a general robbing business and employs three hands. His shop has a frontage of 16x 40 feet. He is of English birth, and has been a resident of the city since 1855.


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